New Music? We’ve Added Lots!

Alan Haber's Pure Pop RadioPerhaps our most favorite thing to do, other than write about great melodic pop music, is to add it to our playlist. We’ll soon hop, skip and jump over the 8,200 tracks mark, on our way to 9,000 and beyond. Won’t that be fun!

Meanwhile, as we work toward clearing those goalposts, we’ve added a slew of new songs and artists to our original 24-hour-a-day mix of the greatest pop in the universe. We’ve got the most variety of any radio station anywhere, incorporating both current and heritage artists from the ’60s to the right here and right now. You’ll love what you’ll hear, and that’s the Pure Pop Radio guarantee!

Here is some of what’s new on our air (check back next week for more):

terry draperTerry Draper | Searching We gave a rave review to this album just about a week ago (you can read what Alan wrote here). We called Searching the first great album of 2016, and for good reason. The level of musicianship and, yes, showmanship evident across this new body of work is something to behold. We’ve added the entire album to the playlist because, really, what else could we have done? The songs, splendid and tuneful and creative and everything else under the sun, are now playing in rotation.

kevin martinKevin Martin | Future Friends This sterling follow-up to 2012’s Throwback Pop is even better than anyone could have hoped for, which is to say that these new songs show just how melodic pop is done right. Hooks and delicious melodies abound. Replayability is assured. We’ve added eight of the 10 songs to our playlist: “Not Gonna Let It Go,” “Castles in the Sand,” “I’m Doing Fine,” “Up In a Cloud,” “The Unknown,” “Diamonds,” and our favorite one-two punch: the upbeat, hit bound “Julia” and “Goodbye,” a lovely, heartbreaking, beautifully arranged song about loss. This is the real deal, destined to be one of our favorite records of this year.

tiny volcanoTiny Volcano | Tiny Volcano Scott McPherson more than dabbles in a deep paintbox full of melodic pop projects including Pop 4, Sproutless, Liar’s Club and this group, whose 2003 debut has just been remastered anew by the maestro himself. Is it going too far to say that these songs, all poppy and catchy and all the rest of it all, have been reborn? We don’t think so. Tracks like the crunchy, guitar-filled “Mary Goes Around,” the Merseybeat nod “You Wanna Go,” the dreamy waltz “Building a Bridge (Out of Water),” and the country-ish bopper “Ten Nights in a Row” dazzle, but they’re only some of this album’s classic numbers. In addition to these tracks, we’re playing “Loaded Gun,” “Wonderful Sun,” and “Summer Solstice,” an affectionate Beach Boys audio sculpture. Remastered and reborn? You bet.

electric starsThe Electric Stars | “Loaded With Regrets” and “The Only Lover Left Alive” Jason Edge and crew debut two explosive new songs that will be part of the Electric Stars’ forthcoming album. “Loaded With Regrets” is a Rolling Stones-styled (a la “Wild Horses”) tearjerker; “The Only Lover Left Alive” rocks and rolls with T. Rex flavor (and an instrumental section dipped in dynamic international mystery). Both are now playing in rotation.

4PAN1TThe Last Conspirators | Hold that Thought Forever New York State pop-rockers The Last Conspirators’s fourth album takes charge with muscular songs, written by singer Tim Livingston and guitarist Nick Bisanz, that demand attention. We’re playing four tracks in rotation, all surging with crunchy guitars, great hooks and Livingston’s urgent vocals: “Perfect Lovers in a Complicated World,” “Fortune Teller,” “Russian Eyes,” and “Two Days in May,” a powerful ballad. Now playing in rotation and thrilling music lovers worldwide.

cheap trickCheap Trick | “No Direction Home” The first song released from the band’s upcoming album, enticingly titled Bang Zoom Crazy… Hello, is a typically engaging pop rocker with one of those, what do you call them…hooky chorus things? Yeah, that’ll work. Album number 17 sees release on April 1.

 

anton barbeauAnton Barbeau | Magic Act We go way back with this always surprising, innovative and wholly original musician–almost to Pure Pop Radio’s beginnings in the mid-1990s. Anton’s latest is perhaps his strongest long player yet–a vital collection of pop numbers designed to get your attention and make you sing along. We’re playing four songs in rotation from this forthcoming release: “High Noon,” the very Anton titled “Sit Your Leggy Down,” “Swindon” (about as close to a folk song as Anton gets), and the very Bowie-esque “Milk Churn in the Morning.” It’s always great to have new Ant music to play on the air.

the surfin' burritosThe Surfin Burritos | “King of the Party” and “Devil’s Newsletter” From Spain comes a pair of early rock ‘n’ roll rave-ups that will get you up on the dance floor pronto. Breathless and breathing fire, both “King of the Party” and “Devil’s Newsletter” spew sharp beats and toothy melodies. And then there’s that band name. If our burrito went surfin’ off our plate, we’d probably worry. But there’s no need to worry here. Dance the night away.

one like son uglyOne Like Son | Ugly And now for another top-flight collection from pop rockers One Like Son. There’s something for everyone here, such as a decidedly Tom Petty-esque vibe in the pretty “Midwest Summer Nights.” A strumming ukelele and beautifully arranged strings lie at the heart of the lovely “The Song You’ll Never Hear.” We’re playing these numbers in rotation, plus “Stella,” a country-flavored song with familiar-sounding guitar strumming that wouldn’t have been out of place on a Big Star album; “Lie to Me (One More Time),” an assured blast of Americana; “Tonight,” an acoustic charmer; and “Goodnight Sunshine,” a slow burner of a rock tune. Stephen Poff, take a bow, will you?

vegas with randolph the comeback kidVegas With Randolph | “The Comeback Kid” The latest great tune from the songwriting team of John Ratts and Eric Kern is a typically catchy slice of melodic pop that starts off pretty and gentle and quickly ponies up with a power pop urgency that drives the rest of the song. Vegas With Randolph keeps getting better; Washington, DC’s pop kings are riding high.

the del zorros step away from my heartThe Del Zorros | “Step Away from My Heart” Our love for the music of the Del Zorros knows no bounds. Monte and Stede can sing to us any old time. This new song, not part of the duo’s latest, greatest album, Wilmington, is a determined, tuneful, horn-adorned Stax-ian shuffle that really pleases. Now playing in rotation, of course.

*     *     *     *     *

That’s it for today. We’ve got more new music adds to report–lots more, in fact, and we’ll be bringing you another list of them next week. Until then, why not click on one of the listen links below and hear what we’ve got in store for you!

purepoplogoAlan Haber’s Pure Pop Radio is the original 24-hour Internet radio station playing the greatest melodic pop music from the ’60s to today. From the Beatles to the Spongetones, the Nines, Kurt Baker, the Connection and the New Trocaderos, we play the hits and a whole lot more. Tune in by clicking on one of the listen links below.

Listen to Pure Pop Radio on the go using your Android and iOS devices! Download Our Mobile App.

Click on the image to listen to Alan Haber's Pure Pop Radio through players like iTunes

Click on the image to listen to Alan Haber’s Pure Pop Radio through players like iTunes

Emitt Rhodes’ Triumphant Return

emitt rhodes rainbows endEmitt Rhodes | Rainbow Ends (Omnivore, 2016)
A review by Alan Haber

Emitt Rhodes released three tremendous and influential solo albums during the first four years of the 1970s and then, as quick as that, withdrew from the pop music scene he helped to create and grow after the pressures of writing and recording more music than was realistically possible in a short period of time wore him down.

Now, 43 years after Emitt’s third album, Farewell to Paradise, was released, the artist has recorded a brand-new record, Rainbow Ends, lovingly produced by musician Chris Price. To say that this is another tremendous release by one of pop music’s favorite sons is hardly doing the project justice. It is an incontrovertible fact that this is one of those albums that not only fits into the current pop milieu, it transcends it; put simply, it is as perfect as it is possible to be.

Delivering his buoyant melodies with a rich and emotive vocal timbre, somewhat deeper and more resonant than before, Hawthorne, California’s other favorite son’s songs are played to perfection by a core group consisting of top-flight musicians including Price, Jellyfish’s Roger Joseph Manning Jr., Jason Falkner, Rooney’s Taylor Locke, Fernando Perdomo, the New Pornographers’ Joseph Seiders, and guests such as the Bangles’ Susanna Hoffs, Bleu, and ace utility player Probyn Gregory. To say that this is the collective musical dream team is quite simply putting it mildly.
Emitt Rhodes

The songs on Rainbow Ends are closer in approach and feel to those on Emitt’s Farewell to Paradise album than they are those on his self-titled debut and Mirror, but they are no less powerful and catchy. They may not be played by Emitt in his storied one-man-band mode, but it all sounds like it is as it should be, as if he were behind the kit or standing with a guitar draped over his shoulder (he does play acoustic guitar and piano on some songs).

Alternately playful and emotional, these songs feature all of the hallmarks that fans have come to expect and revere: beautiful, catchy melodies; inventive chord changes; and those velvety, smooth, sturdy and emotive vocals. Perhaps this is no more evident than on the emotional ballad “I Can’t Tell My Heart.” The song is somewhat reminiscent of Mirror‘s “Love Will Stone You,” and a showcase for Emitt’s committed, vocal delivery; the gorgeous melody and emotional lyrics combine to sketch the breakup of a relationship and a considered plea for the other party to embrace the option to heal.

The bluesy pop vibe of the playful and standout track “If I Knew Then” is a showcase for the core players’ talents: Roger Joseph Manning Jr.’s percussive, bass clef-heavy piano; Fernando Perdomo’s deep-voiced bass; Taylor Locke’s Paul McCartney-esque electric guitar riffs, sounding as if they were borrowed from McCartney’s “Let Me Roll It”; and Joseph Seider’s demolition derby drumming are all top-notch.

“Friday’s Love” paints an emotional picture of a weekend romantic encounter that, against all odds, sparks the hope that the connection will roll on into the next week and beyond. Strong harmony vocals, sung by a grouping that includes Bleu, are especially affecting. The closing, title song finds all musical hands on deck for a plea for hope for peace in one’s life in the here-and-now and in the coming days. “I wanna be with the ones I love/Hold them close, give them hugs,” Emitt sings. It’s the universal wish, hopefully come true.

Rainbow Ends is the sweet payoff realized after more than four decades of hope for more music from a true, legendary artist, but really it’s more than that; it’s the passage of dreams into the real, the realization of what was wanted becoming true. Welcome back, Emitt Rhodes.

purepoplogoAlan Haber’s Pure Pop Radio is the original 24-hour Internet radio station playing the greatest melodic pop music from the ’60s to today. From the Beatles to the Spongetones, the Nines, Kurt Baker, the Connection and the New Trocaderos, we play the hits and a whole lot more. Tune in by clicking on one of the listen links below.

(Emitt Rhodes photo by Greg Allen)

Listen to Pure Pop Radio on the go using your Android and iOS devices! Download Our Mobile App.

Click on the image to listen to Alan Haber's Pure Pop Radio through players like iTunes

Click on the image to listen to Alan Haber’s Pure Pop Radio through players like iTunes

Next Week: Welcome Back Pure Pop Radio’s Specialty Shows

Next week marks the triumphant return of three of Pure Pop Alan Haber's Pure Pop RadioRadio’s popular specialty shows. Welcome back Ken Michaels’ Every Little Thing, the weekly Beatles music program of record; Things We Said Today, the weekly Beatles roundtable hosted by a quartet of Fabs experts; and Brian Bringelson’s Needle Meets Vinyl, where all of the music revolves at 33 1/3 rpm.

All three of our specialty shows return in their regularly-scheduled time slots. On Monday, February 1 at 8 pm ET (5 pm PT), Every Little Thing will fill the airwaves with an episode featuring an interview with author Anthony Robustelli and a quartet of Beatle-esque-sounding solo songs. On Wednesday, February 3 at 8 pm ET (5 pm PT), a wide variety of sumptuous sounds from the Who, the Beatles, the Beach Boys and the Guess Who, among others, will spin at 33 1/3 rpm on Needle Meets Vinyl. And on Thursday, February 4 at 8 pm ET (5 pm PT), Ken Michaels, Steve Marinucci, Al Sussman and Allan Kozinn will talk about Beatles producer Sir George Martin’s 90th birthday, celebrated on January 3, and the Beatles music now streaming on nine online services, including Spotify, on Things We Said Today.

pop tunes disc smallAlan Haber’s Pop Tunes will return soon. Check back here for details on the first new episode of 2016.

everylittlethinglogo-smallEvery Little Thing is the premiere, syndicated program playing Beatles group and solo recordings. Hosted by longtime radio personality Ken Michaels, the show airs a mix of new and archived shows on Monday nights at 8 pm ET on Pure Pop Radio.

needle meets vinylNeedle Meets Vinyl is the weekly show during which all songs are played from vinyl records. The music spans the decades during which popular music has flourished. Curated and presented by Brian Bringelson, a member of the band Anchor and Bear and a solo artist under the name Paul Starling, the show airs Wednesday nights at 8 pm ET (5 pm PT).

the-beatles-things-we-said-todayThings We Said Today is a weekly survey of all things Beatles that’s hosted by a quartet of Beatles experts–today’s Fab Four, if you will. Ken Michaels, host of Every Little Thing, is joined by Beatlefan Executive Editor Al Sussman, Steve Marinucci(Beatles Examiner), and Allan Kozinn, longtime music critic. Other well-known Beatles experts sometimes sit in with the core group. Things We Said Today airs Thursday nights at 8 pm ET on Pure Pop Radio.

purepoplogoAlan Haber’s Pure Pop Radio is the original 24-hour Internet radio station playing the greatest melodic pop music from the ’60s to today. From the Beatles to the Spongetones, the Nines, Kurt Baker, the Connection and the New Trocaderos, we play the hits and a whole lot more. Tune in by clicking on one of the listen links below.

Listen to Pure Pop Radio on the go using your Android and iOS devices! Download Our Mobile App.

Click on the image to listen to Alan Haber's Pure Pop Radio through players like iTunes

Click on the image to listen to Alan Haber’s Pure Pop Radio through players like iTunes

Terry Draper’s Searching is the First Great Album of 2016

As we wrote last week, we’ve been spinning some sumptuous sounds with an ear toward adding them to our ever-growing playlist, now nearly 8,200 songs strong. We’ve been busy doing just that; here is a featured review of one of our favorite artist’s new album; we’ll run down reviews of other recent playlist adds early next week.

terry draperTerry Draper | Searching A work crafted with care in the time-honored melodic pop tradition, former Klaatu member Terry Draper’s Searching is the first great album of 2016, and in an age in which albums are increasingly in less favor than single tracks, it is a shining example of the art of the complete musical statement. It is a collection of songs placed in just the right sequence because that is what you do.

You could certainly cherry-pick from these 14 songs (one hidden) and play the ones that resonate most with you–you could do that any old time, but the artist, I would bet, requests your full attention while the running order plays through exactly as it is presented. For full effect, of course. Then, have at your iPhone playlists and such. Then, you’re in the driver’s seat.

These wonderful songs, so clever and so catchy and shimmering with the level of skill mastered through more than a few years–a lifetime, really–of working at the art of the melodic pop tradition in Klaatu and a brightly lit solo career, are sometimes even surprising, in that they suggest one experience and deliver that one and another on top of it.

Sometimes, this happens when you’re not even looking, like in the lovely title number, an emotional tone poem that trades balladry for an uptempo pop structure about two-thirds of the way through. Ostensibly a love song, there appears to be somewhat more to this story, as love and hope reach out beyond the stars for answers, for direction…and for the next steps on our mutual journeys.

terry draper photoOur journeys don’t always intersect, although the hope that that could come to pass is at the center of the wistful “Our Park Bench.” The narrator pines for a love that has moved on as memories of the couple’s time together leave him hungry for reconnection, even as those memories may be all that there is.

But there is always what there is, a feeling that lies at the heart of another gorgeous tone poem, the quite pretty “All We Can Do.” “All we can do is all we can do/It’s all me and you can ever hope to do,” Terry sings as tempos and moods shift around him. And speaking of moods, the delicious, hidden instrumental that appears mere seconds after the closing medley, a combined cover of two favorite pop hits from yesteryear–the Lovin’ Spoonful’s “Younger Girl” and the Cowsills’ “The Rain, the Park and Other Things”–fuses Indian classical music with poetic, melodic pop as it pays homage to the Moody Blues from the group’s In Search of the Lost Chord era. “Younger Girl, Flower Girl”‘s mood is joyous. It’s a celebration.

And celebration is the name of the game in two terrific pop numbers: “Jules and Me,” a most catchy flight of fancy that sets the singer off on a wondrous bonding journey with the spirit of the celebrated author of “Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea” and other fantastic, classic writings; and “Everything Will Be Alright,” an uptempo song that, in a perfect world, would be zooming its way up the hit charts as I write these words.

Playing the lion’s share of instruments on these songs, Terry is joined by such guest stars as Jamie and Steve’s Jamie Hoover; Ray Paul, whose first album in many years will be released soon; and famed musician Lou Pomanti, who plays some particularly tasty, jazzy piano on the nostalgic “Monogamous Me.” Ted Jones, who Klaatu fans will certainly be familiar with from his cover illustrations for the group’s albums, supplied the glorious cover art here.

All of the songs from Searching are now playing in rotation on Pure Pop Radio, as nature surely intended. These are the songs of your life here at the start of this hopeful new year, created for you in the time-honored melodic pop tradition.

– Alan Haber

purepoplogoAlan Haber’s Pure Pop Radio is the original 24-hour Internet radio station playing the greatest melodic pop music from the ’60s to today. From the Beatles to the Spongetones, the Nines, Kurt Baker, the Connection and the New Trocaderos, we play the hits and a whole lot more. Tune in by clicking on one of the listen links below.

Listen to Pure Pop Radio on the go using your Android and iOS devices! Download Our Mobile App.

Click on the image to listen to Alan Haber's Pure Pop Radio through players like iTunes

Click on the image to listen to Alan Haber’s Pure Pop Radio through players like iTunes

I Love that Album! #1: Fountains of Wayne’s Utopia Parkway (1999)

fountains of wayneFountains of Wayne | Utopia Parkway (Atlantic, 1999)
by Alan Haber

If Frank Capra had made a movie based on the songs populating Fountains of Wayne’s Utopia Parkway album, he might have called it It’s a Mundane Life. For 14 songs, Adam Schlesinger and Chris Collingwood explore the normal, everyday concerns of a population of everyday people, giving life to everyday acts of observation.

A well-imagined tour de force, Utopia Parkway chronicles the dreams of a hopeful musician (the title song), of momentary escape to the stars (“Laser Show”), of the boy who loves an airhead (“Lost in Space”), of mall explorers and bargain hunters (“The Valley of Malls”), of the clueless throwbacks to a spacier time (“Go, Hippie”).

Working both left and right of a decidedly pure pop center, and always with an eye on crafty turns of phrase and musical verbiage, Schlesinger and Collingwood pay attention to the details, whether they’re delivering a ’90s version of a Warner Brothers cartoon (“Hat and Feet”) or getting inside the head of a clueless guy who’s trying to get the girl (“Red Dragon Tattoo”).

red dragon tattooThe hopeful hero of “Red Dragon Tattoo” is a nebbishy boy whose plan to convince a girl to declare her love for him comprises a drunken trip to a tattoo parlor and a proud proclamation that, after being inked, he looks “a little more like that guy from KorN.” If he’s “fit to be dyed,” he wonders to the girl “Am I fit to have you.”

The song’s wordplay swings for the fences always. At the tattoo parlor, the boy observes his surroundings: “I hear the man say you want to see the others/A mermaid and a heart that says mother/But I don’t know from maritime/And I never did hard time,” he sings, offering a snapshot of his experience. “I brought a .38 Special CD collection/Some Bactine to prevent infection/And in case I get queasy/A photo of Easy Rider,” he continues, rattling off his ideas of protection.

The world-class lover narrating the sprightly “Denise” pines for the girl, but his concept of her being hardly comes to grips with what makes her attractive in the first place. Or does it? “I heard she used to be married/She listens to Puff Daddy/She works at Liberty Travel/She got a heart made of gravel,” he tells us, not quite getting to the heart of what makes Denise tick and puts his heart into flutter mode.

Another clueless mope sees himself reduced to the bare minimum and not necessarily the bare essentials in “Hat and Feet.” Dumped by his girl, he tries to run, only to be reduced to a chapeau and a pair of limbs. The couple drawn in the heartbreaking “Troubled Times” have slipped through each other’s fingers. “The way the days and hours pass you’ll never understand/Falling like rain through your hands,” the narrator observes. Yet, they might make it through after all, however tenuously: “Maybe one day soon/It’ll all come out/How you dream about each other sometimes/With a memory of/How you once gave up/But you made it through the troubled times.”

fountains of wayne 2

Fountains of Wayne

The songs on Utopia Parkway together constitute the script for a gripping reality show, delivered with customary verve by Fountains of Wayne.  In “Prom Theme,” Schlesinger and Collingwood accurately, and painfully, present a wistful snapshot of the momentary highs of the ubiquitous prom night experience. “The moment soon will pass,” Collingwood sings. “It’s all downhill from there.” But the kids will have their moment before night passes into day and the real world milieu sets in. “But tonight we’ll reach for the stars/We’ll rent expensive cars/And dream our dreams/Of a perfect night.”

The art of observation, especially in a three-minute pop song, can be a tricky proposition, but in the hands of Schlesinger and Collingwood, it’s the definition of truth. They may be dealing with the lesser lights living on Utopia Parkway and elsewhere across this great land, but they harbor great affection for them. They don’t judge their subjects; they report on their movements and give them room to breathe. Sometimes, their characters don’t have to put words together in a sentence. Sometimes, in fact, all they have to do is mutter “Sha la la la la la,” as does the lost-in-love target in the wistful “The Senator’s Daughter.”

Dressing their colorful songs with lovely melodies and tried-and-true song constructs, Schlesinger and Collingwood tell the stories of our lives in three-minute frozen moments in time. “I got it made, I got it down,” the future big time rock star sings in “Utopia Parkway.” Schlesinger and Collingwood, working with powers far beyond those of mortal songwriters and performers, have done the same, and saved humanity in the process.

purepoplogoAlan Haber’s Pure Pop Radio is the original 24-hour Internet radio station playing the greatest melodic pop music from the ’60s to today. From the Beatles to the Spongetones, the Nines, Kurt Baker, the Connection and the New Trocaderos, we play the hits and a whole lot more. Tune in by clicking on one of the listen links below.

Listen to Pure Pop Radio on the go using your Android and iOS devices! Download Our Mobile App.

Click on the image to listen to Alan Haber's Pure Pop Radio through players like iTunes

Click on the image to listen to Alan Haber’s Pure Pop Radio through players like iTunes

We Serve Up a Quartetly Add to the Pure Pop Radio Playlist

The past few days saw us spinning some sumptuous sounds from a top-flight quartet of artists. We’ve added these sounds to our playlist; they’re now spinning in rotation, making the world a brighter, more melodic place.

jodee purkypileFrom our old friend JoDee Purkypile comes a new song that the artist describes as “a sad waltz” that features “Revolver-era McCartney harmonies.” He warns that the recording “might rip your speakers.” To all of which we say “Nah,” although we do give the nod to at least the second pronouncement. Frankly, those Macca harmonies in the chorus absolutely slay us. Ditto for the very pop guitar solo. “Here for Love” is a triumph that you’ll want to hear over and over again. At least.

merivalFrom Toronto, Canada comes Anna Horvath, who records under the name Merival and used to be in a band called First Rate People. Lovers is her first-rate, first-ever solo EP. We’d call her music first-rate folk with a pop edge; whatever you’d call it, you’d have to classify it as tasty. We’re playing three songs from Lovers: “Kickin’ You Out,” which charts a course for escape from a relationship that has slipped away; “Dream of Yourself,” a wisp of a tune and a vocal showcase atop a plunking banjo; and “Calendar,” a meeting of spare acoustic guitar figures and Merival’s plaintive voice. Think mid-period Joni Mitchell, if you need a reference point.

sweden just a kidThe band called Sweden and not the same-named country rolls in with a sizzling slice of power pop. “Just a Kid” blazes with lots of guitar fury, a catchy melody, and a children’s choir part that lifts the song’s spirits high. Thanks to Caddy’s Tom Dahl for bringing this one to our attention. It’s a good one.

 

mimi boswellRock photographer and guitarist Mimi Boswell and her friends, a stately group of cohorts that includes the Doughboys’ Myke Scavone and Richard X. Heyman, enter our playlist with a tough-as-nails pop/rocker, exhibiting equal echoes of the Rolling Stones and the Rascals. “Torn to Pieces” was mixed and mastered to rocky perfection by Pure Pop Radio pal Kurt Reil at his House of Vibes studio.

purepoplogoGet cozy with these and more than 8,100 other like-minded tracks by tuning into Pure Pop Radio. Alan Haber’s Pure Pop Radio is the original 24-hour Internet radio station playing the greatest melodic pop music from the ’60s to today. From the Beatles to the Spongetones, the Nines, Kurt Baker, the Connection and the New Trocaderos, we play the hits and a whole lot more. Tune in by clicking on one of the listen links below.

Listen to Pure Pop Radio on the go using your Android and iOS devices! Download Our Mobile App.

Click on the image to listen to Alan Haber's Pure Pop Radio through players like iTunes

Click on the image to listen to Alan Haber’s Pure Pop Radio through players like iTunes

So How Was Your Vacation?

Alan Haber: Proud Music Geek!Well, technically, my time away from these pages wasn’t a vacation. In fact, it was anything but a bout of fun in the sun. As those of you who follow me on Facebook already know, I’ve had some medical issues to deal with these past few months. On New Year’s Eve, I had an operation to correct a digestion problem, and just a few days later, I found myself in the hospital again with arterial flutter.

So how was your vacation? I’m happy to report that things are much better now. I’m feeling pretty good and raring to dive back into the melodic pop pool. I’ve added some new music to the Pure Pop Radio playlist and I’ve rejiggered the station’s top-secret rotation logic for maximum, hooky goodness.

what's-newNew and now playing in rotation are Cheap Trick’s “No Direction Home,” which apparently will be part of the venerable popsters’ next album. Also spinning are great new tracks from Anton Barbeau, from his latest album, Magic Act; Chris Murphy; Torbjorn Petersson (his new EP); Rocket Bureau; Paul Melancon and the New Insecurities; the Surfin’ Burritos; Javier Escovedo; One Like Son, who are in a country-esque mood on their superb new album, Ugly; New Sincerity Works; the Del Zorros (a spectacular new song, “Step Away from My Heart”); Mimi Boswell and Friends; and Vegas With Randolph, with another rousing number, “The Comeback Kid.”

50,000If I may, I’d like to pat these pages on their melodic backs: More than 50,000 pop fans have read the words we’ve stitched together since we opened for business back in late December 2013 (thanks one and all). Our number one post, by a hook-filled mile, is our review of Jeff Lynne’s instantly legendary September 14, 2014 show in London’s Hyde Park. Posted on September 16, 2014, it’s still got that ELO magic; read it here, for the first time or once again for good measure.

Thanks for hanging in there with us. We’re here to stay; we hope you wouldn’t have it any other way. Hugs and kisses.

Alan Haber
January 13, 2016

purepoplogoAlan Haber’s Pure Pop Radio is the original 24-hour Internet radio station playing the greatest melodic pop music from the ’60s to today. From the Beatles to the Spongetones, the Nines, Kurt Baker, the Connection and the New Trocaderos, we play the hits and a whole lot more. Tune in by clicking on one of the listen links below.

Listen to Pure Pop Radio on the go using your Android and iOS devices! Download Our Mobile App.

Click on the image to listen to Alan Haber's Pure Pop Radio through players like iTunes

Click on the image to listen to Alan Haber’s Pure Pop Radio through players like iTunes