New on Pure Pop Radio 08.31.17: Jerry Yester’s Vital Pass Your Light Around and Phil Angotti’s Majestic Such Stories

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Spins and Reviews | 08.31.17
By Alan Haber – Pure Pop Radio alan 5 small

Yester - Pass Your Light Around OV-246Jerry Yester | Pass Your Light Around (Omnivore, 2017)
The list of artists Jerry Yester was associated with back in the 1960s and 1970s suggests his path in the music was lit by angels; he played in bands as diverse as the Lovin’ Spoonful, the Modern Folk Quartet, and Rosebud, and sat in the producer’s chair for albums by artists such as the Association, Tim Buckley, and the Turtles.

Yester, who started out playing in a duo dubbed the Yester Brothers with his equally talented brother Jim (who was a member of the Association and, in fact, still is), recorded various tracks through the 1970s yet never released a solo album. Enter Omnivore Records, which came to the rescue and righted a decades-old wrong with this glorious collection of 15 songs that act collectively as a master class in pop singing and songwriting.

These wonderful songs, written with Larry Beckett, who worked with Tim Buckley, run the gamut from the country-tinged celebratory pop of the joyous “My Dusty Darling” to the pretty, almost hymnlike “Brooklyn Girl,” which features some of the most intricate, close and affecting harmonies you could imagine hearing; and the amazing “All I Can Do is Dance,” a very Association-like performance that also puts the emphasis on singing that will do nothing less than send shivers up your spine.

Omnivore has been at the forefront of the much-appreciated and important movement to rescue and bring to light important catalog and previously-unheard recordings.  Being able to appreciate music from years past allows listeners to better understand and put into context the breadth of an artist’s career. With Pass Your Light Around, the company has released what can only be viewed as one of the most vital releases of 2017.

black box Where to Get It: The Omnivore Shop (Pre-order) (releases October 6)

phil angotti such storiesPhil Angotti | Such Stories (2017)
A staple of Pure Pop Radio playlists since the early 2000s, Chicago musician Phil Angotti’s music, whether performed solo or with his group the Idea, is always an engaging listen. This new album, a stripped-down collection of personal, acoustic songs with just guitars, accordion and dulcimer in the mix, offers a chance to hear Phil’s songs in an intimate setting.

These heartfelt songs resonate deeply with meaning and emotion. “Brown Eyes Never Lie,” against a vaguely old English folk backdrop, peers into a soul that’s lost its way, and offers a way back: “You can always get it back/So smile a little smile/Sad eyes don’t look good on you/And sorrow’s not your style.” The narrator of “Sunny Day on the East Side” is out for a stroll amidst random observations, when the sun goes down and it’s time to take stock: “And now it’s late and the sun is gone/We’re walking home/Sing a Beatles song/We laugh as if there is nothing wrong/It was a sunny day on the east side.” Is he hiding some regret?

Perhaps the centerpiece of this album is the joyous “Singing in the Yard,” in which a young boy auditions for a life in song (“In a small backyard he waits and stands alone/A broomstick and a ball for a microphone/You can hear his voice from across the fence/Patiently waiting for his audience”). By the end of the song, he finds himself assessing his position, a commitment to his burgeoning art: “It’s time to go, his friends are off to play/Though he wants to be one of them, he’s miles away/Though he wants to go along/He’s worlds away.”

An insightful collection of songs, beautifully sung and played, Such Stories is such a draw of honest emotion set to lovely melodies that I can’t help but recommend it wholeheartedly to one and all.

black box Where to Get It: CD Baby, iTunes. Listen on Spotify

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Pure Pop Radio’s signature shows, Alan Haber’s Pop Tunes Deejay Show, playing the latest and greatest melodic pop songs from today and across the decades, and Pure Pop Radio: In Conversation, the premiere Internet melodic pop talk show, air weekly on Pop that Goes Crunch Radio.

pop tunes disc smallin conversation new graphic blueListen to the Pop Tunes Deejay Show on Tuesdays and Thursdays at 8 pm ET (two different shows every week); In Conversation airs every Wednesday night at 9 pm ET. Don’t miss a minute!

Tune in to Pop that Goes Crunch Radio by clicking on the following snazzy-looking button:

Pure Pop Radio’s Hall of Fame Inducts Fountains of Wayne’s Utopia Parkway (Atlantic, 1999)

hall of fame
By Alan Haber – Pure Pop Radio
alan 5 small

fountains of wayne utopia parkwayWhat Is It?
Pure Pop Radio’s Hall of Fame celebrates unparalleled work in the field of melodic pop music. All kinds of melodic pop are eligible for induction, from soft-pop to power-pop and all points in-between. Country-pop, bubblegum, art-pop and the like are welcome. Singles, EPs, and albums are eligible from the 1960s to today. The only caveat is an inductee must emphasize melody above all else.

Our First Inductee:
Fountains of Wayne’s Utopia Parkway (Atlantic, 1999)

Our first inductee is an album that basically drew the blueprint for all melodic pop albums that followed it. Fountains of Wayne’s Utopia Parkway’s 14 songs, chiming with lovely, catchy melodies, lots of guitars, sumptuous singing, et al., are populated by all sorts of eclectic characters, whose captivating stories are told in the catchiest of musical terms. The bar is set high; each of these songs aims for lyrical and melodic excellence and hits the bullseye every time.

A concept album of sorts, Utopia Parkway can be seen as a snapshot of life in the five boroughs of New York, or in the areas surrounding your town if you prefer, because, really, the themes pursued within this album are fairly universal, even as some of the songs refer to actual living, breathing landmarks and concern people types whom you and I might well know.

Liberty Travel; Coney Island; the Hayden Planetarium; the Long Island Expressway, or as it’s better known, the L.I.E., or as it’s even better known, The World’s Largest Parking Lot; the Jersey Shore; and Long Island Sound get name-checked along the musical journey down and around Utopia Parkway. And then there are the people that populate the area.

Back cover of Utopia Parkway booklet

Back cover of Utopia Parkway booklet

Under the Hood
Take the title song, which takes place on Utopia Parkway, a big area in Queens, New York. The song tells the story of an underachiever who’s “…never turned from boy to man.” The narrator is a budding music star who pledges to staple fliers everywhere to get his “name in front of everyone.” In the end, though, he admits that “they’ll never know what hit them when” he’s “gone.”

The similarly underachieving, clueless-in-love sap of the classic “Red Dragon Tattoo” takes listeners on a virtual tour of his stated objective: to get the girl. He boasts about getting “engraved,” but only after getting drunk. He pines to get a Red Dragon Tattoo slapped on his person, which he believes ought to do the trick. In fact, he seems convinced of it, kinda-sorta, although he does question his viability: “I’m fit to be dyed/Am I fit to have you.”

The Red Dragon Tattoo is going to transform this guy into an alluring figure. “Will you stop pretending I’ve never been born/Now I look a little more like that guy from KorN,” he sings to his intended. “If you came a little bit closer/You’d see it isn’t painted on.” And, by gum, it’s real!

Also real are the emotions felt and communicated by songwriters Chris Collingwood and Adam Schlesinger. The subject of the heartfelt yet sad “Hat and Feet,” a Warner Bros. cartoon come to life, is reduced to being “a spot on the sidewalk/A mark on the street.” And he couldn’t bear to confront the issues at hand: “I started running when I saw it coming/It got faster and louder til I took a powder.”

The unflinchingly sad “Troubled Times” chronicles a relationship whose clock has run out, the end of which is at least guardedly copacetic (“Maybe one day soon it’ll all come out/How you dream about each other sometimes/With a memory of how you once gave up/But you made it through the troubled times.” I cry while listening to this one all the time.

James and Jason, Kirk and Lars, in no particular order

James and Jason, Kirk and Lars, in no particular order

Hold the Gloom
All is not gloomy along Utopia Parkway, however. The kids barrelled into their parents’ car in the goofy “Laser Show” “come from Bridgeport, Westport, Darien/Down to the Hayden Planetarium,” where Pink Floyd’s Dark Side of the Moon would play as images were thrust upon the walls surrounding them. But these kids might be after bigger prey: “We’re gonna sit back, relax, watch the stars/James and Jason, Kirk and Lars,” they proclaim. And then it’s time to go home: “We’re gonna make our way cross the galaxy/And then we’ll head back home on the L.I.E.” If they can get out of the “parking lot,” that is.

I always thought the girl in the peppy “Lost in Space” was just a well-meaning hippie chick–a little off-center, perhaps. And that’s the way the lyrics portray her, but I always held a bit of caution, thinking that there might be more to her aloofness. A serious undercurrent to an otherwise playful song? Or could she possibly be a lovable pterodactyl or an alien from Mars? After all, according to the song, “…she walks the earth/But she’s not from the human race/She’s a pretty little thing but she’s lost/Yeah she’s lost in space…”

The happy, guitar-centric power pop number “It Must Be Summer” sounds like it’s a celebration of sun, surf and sand, but it’s really a jaunty lament of the girl that got–no, went–away. “…it must be summer/Cause I’m falling apart.”

The album closer, a somber number called “The Senator’s Daughter,” is all about the noise that permeates our conversations. All sorts of people go about their business, from teenage girls to soccer moms, and talk, talk, talk, without the messages getting through: “He say/Sha la la la la la/He say/Sha la la la la la.”

brilliant_mind_cs2A New Look
This isn’t the first time I’ve thought and written about Fountains of Wayne’s Utopia Parkway; it was the subject, on January 19, 2016, of the first entry in my I Love that Album! series (read it here to possibly get some more insight). Obviously, that wasn’t the end of my fascination with this incredible, topically dense album.

Albums such as Utopia Parkway demand your attention and pay off dividends. Through its songs, you learn a little bit more about life in general and, perhaps–just perhaps–a little bit more about your life. Of course, you could just tap your feet and play air guitar as the songs roll, but that would be shortchanging this album’s copious rewards.

Which is why this album–Fountains of Wayne’s Utopia Parkway–is the first melodic pop work to be inducted into Pure Pop Radio’s Hall of Fame.

The Deets

Fountains of Wayne/Utopia Parkway (Atlantic, 1999)

Personnel: Chris Collingwood, lead vocals, guitar, keyboards; Adam Schlesinger, vocals, bass, guitar, keyboards; Jody Porter, guitar, vocals; Brian Young, drums, percussion

The Songs:
1. Utopia Parkway
2. Red Dragon Tattoo
3. Denise
4. Hat and Feet
5. The Valley of Malls
6. Troubled Times
7. Go, Hippie
8. A Fine Day for a Parade
9. Amity Gardens
10. Laser Show
11. Lost in Space
12. Prom Theme
13. It Must Be Summer
14. The Senator’s Daughter

Producers: Chris Collingwood and Adam Schlesinger

black box Where to Get It: Amazon, iTunes

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Pure Pop Radio’s signature shows, Alan Haber’s Pop Tunes Deejay Show, playing the latest and greatest melodic pop songs from today and across the decades, and Pure Pop Radio: In Conversation, the premiere Internet melodic pop talk show, air weekly on Pop that Goes Crunch Radio.

pop tunes disc smallin conversation new graphic blueListen to the Pop Tunes Deejay Show on Tuesdays and Thursdays at 8 pm ET (two different shows every week); In Conversation airs every Wednesday night at 9 pm ET. Don’t miss a minute!

Tune in to Pop that Goes Crunch Radio by clicking on the following snazzy-looking button:

 

New on Pure Pop Radio 08.29.17: NRBQ, Bubble Gum Orchestra, Neil Finn, Winterpills, and Crime Scene are Top of the Pops

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Spins and Reviews | 08.29.17
By Alan Haber – Pure Pop Radio

NRBQ - Happy TalkNRBQ | Happy Talk (Omnivore, 2017)
Entertaining adoring audiences for five decades, the undeniably versatile and forever-sure-to-please band shows no signs of hanging up their rather extensive repertoire. Happy Talk, a joyous five-song EP that was cut during a touring break, follows the well-received, mammoth and comprehensive five-CD box set, High Noon: A 50-Year Retrospective, which was released last November to great acclaim. Two catchy originals join three choice covers in a must-get collection that screams “Full length, please!” I love the Hee-Hawish toe-tapper “Yes, I Have a Banana,” the succinct take on Roy Orbison’s “Only the Lonely,” and the sprightly, loving and heartfelt version of “Happy Talk,” from South Pacific. Charming through and through, this is a mini-masterpiece.

black box Where to Get It: Pre-order from the Omnivore Shop (releases October 20), Amazon

bubble gum orchestra sixthovertureBubble Gum Orchestra | “The Beatles Made Me” (from the forthcoming album, Sixthoverture)
(2017)
The first single from Bubble Gum Orchestra’s forthcoming long player, Sixthoverture, is a bit of a stylistic departure from Michael Hildebrandt’s creative outlet. The usual overt nods to all things Electric Light Orchestra are tempered in this sweet yet somewhat edgy slice of musical gratitude.

The bulk of the lyric is a thank-you to the Fab Four for inspiration rendered, but there is this quizzical verse: “Abbey Road/Abbey Road nearly ruined me/Just like the love/Just like the love that you stole from me.” Michael says that the Abbey Road bit “is referencing that [the] Abbey Road album was so great to me that anything I would ever listen to after that by any other band would never compare.” And as for the part about love: it “is a relationship thing comparing lost love to also being ruined.” An interesting left turn, indeed.

We are proudly premiering “The Beatles Made Me” on tonight’s edition of the Pop Tunes Deejay Show on Pop that Goes Crunch Radio. We are, in fact, the first North American radio show to play this great song, so thank you, MH.

black box Where to Get It: The BGO Store

neil finn out of silenceNeil Finn | “Second Nature” and “More than One of You” (from the forthcoming album, Out of Silence) | (2017)
Just on the basis of the spirited, orchestrated mid-tempo ballad “Second Nature” and the quite lovely “More than One of You,” this is a return to the Crowded House-era side of Neil Finn’s craft, which to my mind has been missing from much of his solo output. Recording live with his band, Finn aimed to record the whole of Out of Silence in a three-hour session on August 25 with a quick release date, now looking like September 22. Neil Finn has delivered to the world some of the most melodic songs heard since his time in Split Enz and on through the Crowded House years and beyond. These two new songs are more-than-worthy additions to his catalog.

black box Where to Get It: Amazon (Here and here); Album pre-order

winterpills colorblindWinterpills | “Colorblind” (2017)
A new release from Winterpills, one of my favorite bands of those I’ve discovered in recent years, is always welcome. A typically catchy, widescreen recording of a typically catchy song, “Colorblind” is another notch in the Northampton, Massachusetts band’s win column. How do I describe this song? I couldn’t possibly do better than the description posted on the band’s Bandcamp page, so here goes: “‘Colorblind’ features an infectious wall-of-sound vocal hook, samples recorded into an iPhone in a DC parking lot, out-of-tune pianos colliding over a burned-out city, a fat R&B beat, all poured through the alchemy of producer Justin Pizzoferrato’s overdrive brain.” That about sums it up. Now go get it.

black box Where to Get It: Bandcamp

Crime Scene - Alter Life - smallCrime Scene | Alter Life (2017)
Three members of Swedish pop-rockers Crime Scene were players in the much-missed Longplayer Orchestra (Ulf Holmberg, Jon Sundberg, and Göran Holmberg). Their new songs may hit harder than the poppier Longplayer output, but they are no less catchy and appealing. Crime Scene’s crafted ingredients, cooked up with fourth member Per Östling, top the pops with songs like power ballad “No Gravity,” the pretty “I Tend to Shy Away,” and album closer “Almost Spring,” a gorgeous number that features a lovely vocal turn from guest singer Trish Sheldon and just a hint of banjo accent. A can’t-miss collection.

black box Where to Get It: Apple Music, Amazon Digital. Listen on Spotify

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Pure Pop Radio’s signature shows, Alan Haber’s Pop Tunes Deejay Show, playing the latest and greatest melodic pop songs from today and across the decades, and Pure Pop Radio: In Conversation, the premiere Internet melodic pop talk show, air weekly on Pop that Goes Crunch Radio.

pop tunes disc smallin conversation new graphic blueListen to the Pop Tunes Deejay Show on Tuesdays and Thursdays at 8 pm ET (two different shows every week); In Conversation airs every Wednesday night at 9 pm ET. Don’t miss a minute!

Tune in to Pop that Goes Crunch Radio by clicking on the following snazzy-looking button:

Terry Draper, Bubble Gum Orchestra (North America Radio Premiere), Nick Heyward, Gospelbeach, and NRBQ Star on This Week’s Pure Pop Radio Shows on Pop that Goes Crunch

By Alan Haber – Pure Pop Radio alan 5 small

pop that goes crunch logoThis week’s lineup of Pure Pop Radio shows on Pop that Goes Crunch Radio is exploding with today’s top pop stars.

pop tunes disc smallTomorrow night at 8 pm ET on Alan Haber’s Pop Tunes Deejay Show we serve up a big, bulging basketful of new and recently-released pop tunes, with Nick Heyward, Gospelbeach, NRBQ, Neil Finn, and the Doughboys taking center stage alongside Chuck Berry, Mark McCrite, Dent May, Jerry Yester, and many more of your favorites. In addition, we present the North America radio premiere of Bubble Gum Orchestra’s rousing “The Beatles Made Me,” the first single from the band’s forthcoming album, Sixthoverture.

in conversation new graphic blueWednesday night at 9 pm ET, Terry Draper sits in with me on an all-new edition of Pure Pop Radio: In Conversation to talk about his just-released new album, Remarkable Women. It’s another top-flight album from Terry that you won’t want to miss. During the show, you’ll hear three songs that will have you instantly singing along.

pop tunes disc smallThe Pop Tunes Deejay Show returns on Thursday night at 8 pm ET for a potpourri-style get-together that features top melodic pop songs from across the decades. This week, we kick off the proceedings with Ray Stevens’ 1975 toe-tapping country take on the classic number, “Misty.” Coke Belda checks in with a track from his wonderful new album, Coke Belda 3 (Gs), A Tribute to the Bee Gees, and the actual Bee Gees sing sweetly with two of their classic tunes. Add in tracks from the Cherry Drops, Chris White, Badfinger, Optiganally Yours, Derrick Anderson, Michael Penn, and Andy Partridge and you have a tuneful show you won’t want to miss.

So, to recap: Two all-new editions of Alan Haber’s Pop Tunes Deejay Show and a first-run chat with Terry Draper on In Conversation are coming up this week on Pop that Goes Crunch Radio. Click on the Listen Live link below so you won’t miss a minute!

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Pure Pop Radio’s signature shows, Alan Haber’s Pop Tunes Deejay Show, playing the latest and greatest melodic pop songs from today and across the decades, and Pure Pop Radio: In Conversation, the premiere Internet melodic pop talk show, air weekly on Pop that Goes Crunch Radio.

pop tunes disc smallin conversation new graphic blueListen to the Pop Tunes Deejay Show on Tuesdays and Thursdays at 8 pm ET (two different shows every week); In Conversation airs every Wednesday night at 9 pm ET. Don’t miss a minute!

Tune in to Pop that Goes Crunch Radio by clicking on the following snazzy-looking button:

Pure Pop Radio: In Conversation Podcasts: Emitt Rhodes (Airdate: March 20, 1997)

By Alan Haber – Pure Pop Radio alan 5 small

Alan in the studio

Alan in the studio

On this sunny Friday, we go way, way back to 1997. The weekly Pure Pop Radio show was two years old and the number one name on my interview want list was heritage pop artist Emitt Rhodes.

Way back when, WCBS-FM in New York, New York, the city so nice they named it twice, was the place to be for new rock music. Before it became “New York’s Oldies Station,” it was a whole other station. It was the station that broadcast George Harrison’s All Things Must Pass in its entirety, back in the days when radio could do that sort of thing, and it was the station that introduced me to Emitt Rhodes.

emitt rhodes emitt rhodes

Emitt Rhodes, 1970

The deejay, Bobby “Wizard” Wayne, waxed poetically, with just the right dose of enthusiasm, about this wunderkind who played all of the instruments on his debut, self-titled record, who sounded like Paul McCartney; hearing the first 60 seconds of “With My Face on the Floor,” it was obvious that Wayne had hit upon something very special. And the McCartney reference was right on.

Ever since then, Rhodes’ amazing albums have been rotating in and out of my daily playlists, including his most recent release, Rainbow Ends, from last year. I’d always wanted to meet him, but never got the chance… until the very first International Pop Overthrow in Los Angeles. But I’m getting ahead of myself.

As I said, when I started doing my Pure Pop radio show in 1995, Rhodes was at the top of my list of artists to interview. But getting to him was another matter. Ray Paul, then head honcho at the great, much-missed Permanent Press record label, came to my rescue, and set up the interview.

emitt rhodes mirror

Mirror, 1971

Imagine my surprise and delight when I came home one day from doing errands and checked my answering machine and found that Emitt had called me and left his number. Long story short, we spoke later that day and scheduled a day and time for him to be on Pure Pop.

emitt rhodes farewell to paradise

Farewell to Paradise, 1973

That day was March 20, 1997. Talking to Emitt was like a dream come true. We spoke about his three albums that had been released, his songwriting, and much else. At one point, when Emitt took a bit of a break from the interview, I spoke on the air to Emitt’s mother, who related some wonderful, warm anecdotes about her son growing up, and the influence of music on the Rhodes family. I also asked Emitt questions submitted by listeners.

Pop maestro Emitt Rhodes and Pure Pop Radio programmer and host Alan Haber put their heads together in Los Angeles.

Emitt Rhodes and Alan Haber, IPO Los Angeles, 1998

I finally met Emitt, at the first International Pop Overthrow (IPO) festival in 1998. He remarked that he had enjoyed our talk, and that his mother, who had recently died, had enjoyed it, too. He even bought me a soda!

For me, having any contact whatsoever with one of my musical heroes instantly qualifies as a high point of my life. I hope you feel the same way after listening to this interview from 20 years ago.

I hope you enjoy the show.

pprListen to my interview with Emitt Rhodes from March 20, 1997 by clicking the play button on the following player, or click on the Pure Pop Radio button to the left to download (then right click and choose “Save audio as” to save the file to your computer). (This interview is presented in scoped format; the songs have been removed due to copyright concerns.)


Listen to the songs played during this interview by clicking on the following
Spotify links:

“Farewell to Paradise” | https://open.spotify.com/embed/track/0EbcnHIeCryuJ2sqdPVvVQ

“Somebody Made for Me” | https://open.spotify.com/embed/track/5N6UGAAjtWe6NyQ9pMxo45

“Only Lovers Decide” | https://open.spotify.com/embed/track/6OQa2wBtfw1YvajQMsPdUS

“Live” | https://open.spotify.com/embed/track/3LQZ52GYA5V0QjDZyUFlXj

“Bubblegum the Blues/I’m a Cruiser” | https://open.spotify.com/embed/track/5sxJazadYQIhhzvamt86vH

“Ever Find Yourself Running” | https://open.spotify.com/embed/track/0f2o0yWXzHGhgD3p6EvjqV

“Nights are Lonely/Bad Man” | https://open.spotify.com/embed/track/3ia1kM7EI2CJLfP5lANPqs

“Tame the Lion” | https://open.spotify.com/embed/track/5LUHwnRiRfE10bz8pLUrBj

“You Must Have” | https://open.spotify.com/embed/track/5GdAhgRQfFwaQilX8x2tHU

Look out for more current and archived Pure Pop Radio: In Conversation interviews.

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Pure Pop Radio’s signature shows, Alan Haber’s Pop Tunes Deejay Show, playing the latest and greatest melodic pop songs from today and across the decades, and Pure Pop Radio: In Conversation, the premiere Internet melodic pop talk show, air weekly on Pop that Goes Crunch Radio.

pop tunes disc smallin conversation new graphic blueListen to the Pop Tunes Deejay Show on Tuesdays and Thursdays at 8 pm ET (two different shows every week); In Conversation airs every Wednesday night at 9 pm ET. Don’t miss a minute!

Tune in to Pop that Goes Crunch Radio by clicking on the following snazzy-looking button:

Pure Pop Radio: In Conversation Podcasts: Brian Ray (The Bayonets, Paul McCartney’s Band) (Airdate: May 9, 2017)

By Alan Haber – Pure Pop Radio alan 5 small

in conversation new graphic blue

The Bayonets’ Brian Ray, who you may well know from playing in Sir Paul McCartney’s band for so many years, appeared on Pure Pop Radio: In Conversation this past May 9 to talk about the expanded edition of the band’s album Crash Boom Bang! on JEM Records.

the bayonets coverBrian and Oliver Lieber, son of rock royalty classic songwriter Jerry Lieber (of Lieber and Stoller fame), have fashioned a pop album for the ages. It pops, it rocks, and it thrills!

The Bayonets CaracaturesDuring this lively program, Brian talks about how he met Oliver and decided to form The Bayonets. Brian also waxes poetic about songwriting and, in particular, lyric writing. Two songs from Crash Boom Bang! were played: “Sucker for Love,” and the Rolling Stones-y slow burner, “Cotton Candy.”

 

pprListen to my interview with the Bayonets’ Brian Ray from May 9 by clicking the play button on the following player, or click on the Pure Pop Radio button to the left to download (then right click and choose “Save audio as” to save the file to your computer). (This interview is presented in scoped format; the songs have been removed due to copyright concerns.)


Listen to the songs played during this interview by clicking on the following
Spotify links:

“Sucker for Love” | https://open.spotify.com/embed/track/5YMk9uHxf3rWl8B5cyeDYY

“Cotton Candy” | https://open.spotify.com/embed/track/0BsHq9AoYGdc3Fs140KeK0

Look out for more current and archived Pure Pop Radio: In Conversation interviews.

alanhaberspurepopradiographiclarge1-wp header

Pure Pop Radio’s signature shows, Alan Haber’s Pop Tunes Deejay Show, playing the latest and greatest melodic pop songs from today and across the decades, and Pure Pop Radio: In Conversation, the premiere Internet melodic pop talk show, air weekly on Pop that Goes Crunch Radio.

pop tunes disc smallin conversation new graphic blueListen to the Pop Tunes Deejay Show on Tuesdays and Thursdays at 8 pm ET (two different shows every week); In Conversation airs every Wednesday night at 9 pm ET. Don’t miss a minute!

Tune in to Pop that Goes Crunch Radio by clicking on the following snazzy-looking button:

Pure Pop Radio: In Conversation Podcasts: Jamie and Steve (Airdate: August 16, 2017)

By Alan Haber – Pure Pop Radio alan 5 small

in conversation new graphic blue

jamie and steve sub texturalJamie Hoover and Steve Stoeckel, better known these days as the melodic pop duo Jamie and Steve, sat behind the Pure Pop Radio: In Conversation virtual microphones on August 16 to take me and listeners through the ins and outs of their latest hit EP, Sub Textural.

Jamie and Steve talked about three of the smashing songs on Sub Textural: the poptastic “Sword of Love,” the autobiographical “410,” and the basically a cappella “Cry,” a top-flight tour de force that closes out the proceedings. It’s the kind of in-depth back-and-forth that you can only hear on the Internet’s premiere melodic pop talk show.

pprListen to my interview with Jamie and Steve from August 16 by clicking the play button on the following player, or click on the Pure Pop Radio button to the left to download (then right click and choose “Save audio as” to save the file to your computer).

(42.57)


Listen to the songs played during this interview by clicking on the following
Spotify links:

“Sword of Love: | https://open.spotify.com/embed/track/0mR9TA5UKtf4URTPbWt1gM

“410” | https://open.spotify.com/embed/track/4KA10Sr3TePqhPRCQlgq5b

“Cry” | https://open.spotify.com/embed/track/2N0dZh3AP6wLXXN8z0J51f

Look out for more current and archived Pure Pop Radio: In Conversation interviews.

alanhaberspurepopradiographiclarge1-wp header

Pure Pop Radio’s signature shows, Alan Haber’s Pop Tunes Deejay Show, playing the latest and greatest melodic pop songs from today and across the decades, and Pure Pop Radio: In Conversation, the premiere Internet melodic pop talk show, air weekly on Pop that Goes Crunch Radio.

pop tunes disc smallin conversation new graphic blueListen to the Pop Tunes Deejay Show on Tuesdays and Thursdays at 8 pm ET (two different shows every week); In Conversation airs every Wednesday night at 9 pm ET. Don’t miss a minute!

Tune in to Pop that Goes Crunch Radio by clicking on the following snazzy-looking button: