100+ Songs Added to the Pure Pop Radio Playlist, Including the New Single from Paul McCartney. Now’s the Time to Tune In!

alan headshot from schoolBy Alan Haber – Pure Pop Radio

pure pop radio radioMore than 100 new and new-to-you songs, including the latest releases from your favorite melodic pop music artists, have been added to the Pure Pop Radio playlist.

At thpaul mccartney egypt station cover 2018e top of the list are two new songs, released as a single, from Paul McCartney’s forthcoming album, Egypt Station–the stomping rocker “Come On to Me” and the tender ballad, “I Don’t Know.” But that’s not all!

Caper Clowns-Sacre Bleu-Singlecover

Caper Clowns

terry draper latitude adjustmentAlso spinning now in rotation are the latest from the Doughboys, a frantic, pumping take on the Rolling Stones’ “Play With Fire,” and both sides of Caper Clowns fantastic new single–“Sacre Bleu” and “Something of Value.” You will also hear, throughout our broadcast day, the new single from the Outryders, featuring Joe Algeri; Terry Draper’s catchy earworm “Latitude Adjustment,” featuring background vocals from Pure Pop Radio favorite Ray Paul; and Kai Danzberg’s “My Beautiful Day,” written with Dana Countryman.

nick lowe tokyo baydana countryman summer sand cover2018You want more? You’ve got it: Nick Lowe’s new four-sided single, featuring the twangy, upbeat “Tokyo Bay”; Trip Wire’s “Act Fast”; the b-side of Bill Lloyd’s new single, “The Bridesmaid’s Song,” with special guest Raelyn Nelson; tracks from the sprawling new compilation, The Co-Op Communique Vol. 4, including John T. McMullan’s “The Thought of Your Name”; Dana Countryman’s new summer single, the lovely “Summer Sand”; and tracks from the Davenports’ most-welcome new album, Don’t Be Mad at Me.

With all that, we’re just scratching the surface of the catchy tunes you’ll discover when you tune in to Pure Pop Radio, the 24-hour Internet radio station playing the greatest melodic pop music from the ’60s, ’70s and today, with a special emphasis on the latest releases you want to hear.

Don’t miss a minute–tune in now! Click on the Live 365 Listen Now link below, and enjoy!

ppr radio purple background - insetPure Pop Radio plays the greatest melodic pop music from across the decades, 24 hours a day. Listen by clicking on the Live365 Listen Now button at left. Hear us once and you’ll be a listener for life. Join us, won’t you? You’ll be glad you did!

New on Pure Pop Radio 5.16.18: Lisa Mychols, David Myhr, Vanilla and Ken Sharp

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By Alan Haber – Pure Pop Radio

Spins and Reviews | 5.16.18

Lisa Mychols | Sugar (2018)
PrintScheduled for release on June 15 and just in time for summer’s arrival on June 21, Sugar is perhaps the most appropriately titled album of the year–a joyous, harmony-filled singer’s showcase, imbued with sweet songs sung sweetly. This is the sound of pure pop made for a life under sun-drenched skies spreading light and love over lazy mid-year, carefree days.

Sugar is nothing less than Lisa Mychols’ greatest achievement, and that, as has been said before, is really saying something.

One part girl-group aesthetic and one other part sunshine pop, Sugar’s songs, built around gorgeous, rich harmonies and Lisa’s most assured vocals ever, should have no trouble lifting spirits as they entertain. It would be impossible to deny the pleasing power of beauteous creations such as “Loving You” and the full-on, sugary sweet uptempo wonder “Don’t Wanna Close My Eyes.”

And then there is “He’s Got Me Dreaming,” a girl-group confection running atop a steady rock beat, “Domino,” within which rock steady verses meet pop choruses, and “Next to Impossible,” a sweet, bluesy ballad.

It’s a wonder to behold, this album full of wonders. This is your summer album, sung sweetly by one of melodic pop music’s most enduring, endearing talents. Steve Refling produced, played all of the instruments, and co-wrote all of the songs with Lisa. Sugar is sweet. Don’t miss it.

black box Now Playing in Rotation on Pure Pop Radio: “One Revolution,” “Loving You Baby,” “Domino,” “Don’t Wanna Close My Eyes,” “Goodbye to All Carousels,” “Next to Impossible,” “He’s Got Me Dreaming,” and “Into Oblivion”
black box Where to Get It: Check back soon for purchase links

David Myhr | Lucky Day (Lojinx, 2018)
LJX115 David Myhr - Lucky DayA beautifully rendered selection of melody-rich songs from one of melodic pop music’s greatest practitioners, Lucky Day is the sound of a master songwriter’s loving embrace. It is a warmhearted musical journey you will want to take over and over again.

Lucky Day’s 10 lovingly crafted songs, eight written with some of pop music’s top talents while David was on a trip to the United States and two self-scribed, speak to the heart of what matters to melodic pop music fans; all feature beautiful melodies and top-notch playing and singing. All contribute to one of this year’s best albums.

“Room to Grow,” written with Pure Pop Radio favorite Bill DeMain, is about giving a romance all the chances it deserves to prosper. Listening to this song, I hear a rhythmic kinship to Paul McCartney’s “Arrow Through Me.” The background vocals, as the song progresses, suggest a 1930s sort of vibe. The gorgeous harmonica solo, very Stevie Wonder-like, is played with heart and great skill by Mikael Bäckman. It’s quite a delectable stew.

The pretty ballad “Lovebug,” written with another Pure Pop Radio favorite, Linus of Hollywood, who sings background vocals, came about when David arrived at Linus’s home and said hello to the family dog. Linus’s wife said the dog was a lovebug, and therein lay the inspiration for the title of this classic piece of songwriting. The music is pretty, while the lyrics tell a different, bittersweet story–one of a disconnected romance: “I’m under the water and fighting for air/But your gravity’s pulling me down/They tell me I’ll live but I don’t feel alive at all.” It’s quite an achievement.

“The Perfect Place,” one of two songs on Lucky Day written solely by David, soars with an affecting melody, an ultra-catchy chorus, and live strings that ingeniously bring the number to a satisfying, unique conclusion.

And on and on the album goes–one great song after another that you will treasure forever. Produced by Brad Jones, Andreas Dahlbäck and David Myhr, and recorded at Jones’s Alex the Great Recording in Nashville and at studios in Stockholm, Sweden, Lucky Day is a wonderful gift to lovers of melodic pop. And speaking of gifts, CD purchasers should stay tuned after the 10th song plays; a lucky gift awaits.

black box Now Playing in Rotation on Pure Pop Radio: “Jealous Sun,” “The Perfect Place,” “Lucky Day,” “Wait Until the Moment,” “My Negative Friend,” “Room to Grow,” “If You Really Think It’s Over,” and “Lovebug”
black box Where to Get It: Preorder at Lojinx, and at Amazon and iTunes; stream the album at Spotify, Tidal, Deezer and Apple Music, beginning May 18.

Vanilla |”Itchykoo Park” | Mystik Knights of Takoma (2018)

london underground sign(World Radio Premiere on Alan Haber’s Pop Tunes Deejay Show, Thursday, May 17, 8 pm ET on Pop that Goes Crunch Radio)

Jayson Jarmon’s always intriguing outfit returns with another song slated for inclusion on the group’s upcoming Mystik Knights of Takoma collection. This time around, the Vanillians transform the Small Faces’ classic song “Itchykoo Park” by applying a glittery coat of glam inspiration and a straight-ahead rhythm. The result is almost otherworldly, as they gather to breathe new life into Steve Marriott and Ronnie Lane‘s 1967 masterpiece.

Sung with his usual invested, emotional connection to both music and lyrics, guest vocalist Regan Lane, from Strangely Alright, grabs both with total conviction. In the process, he transforms “Itchykoo Park” into a contemporary, psychedelic parable. “It’s all too beautiful,” Lane sings, and he means every syllable. It’s another can’t-miss slice of Vanilla.

black box Now Playing on Pure Pop Radio
black box Where to Get It: Available May 18 at Vanilla’s Bandcamp site

Ken Sharp | “She Hates the Beatles” | Single, 2018
ken sharp she hates the beatles coverAfter musician and co-producer Fernando Perdomo suggested the title, Ken ran with it and conjured up a guy’s ultimate fear: that the girl he loves hates the Fab Four. From that scary conjuring comes this upbeat, catchy pop song that lyrically, and with a healthy dose of jocularity, pounds the ceremonial nail into a relationship’s coffin.

The song’s lyrics get into the down and dirty of this doomed pairing: “She don’t know John from Paul/But baby what’s the worst of all/She thinks Wings is a TV show and Lennon is a Russian mole.” And, what’s more, to drive her point home even further, the narrator relates that  “…when she turns on the radio, she makes me listen to Barry Manilow.” Now, that hurts!

Never mind that “She Hates the Beatles” sounds more like a mashup of ’70s, Partridge Family and Todd Rundgren aesthetics than Beatlesque–this is a fun, catchy ride. Ken and Fernando split the instrumental duties and Ken sings his Beatle-loving heart out. Yeah, yeah, yeah!

black box Now Playing on Pure Pop Radio
black box Where to Get It: Bandcamp

ppr radio purple background - insetPure Pop Radio plays the greatest melodic pop music from across the decades, 24 hours a day. Listen by clicking on the Live365 Listen Now button at left. Hear us once and you’ll be a listener for life. Join us, won’t you? You’ll be glad you did!

Pure Pop Radio’s signature shows, Pure Pop Radio: In Conversation (Wednesday, 9 pm ET) and Alan Haber’s Pop Tunes Deejay Show (Thursday, 8 pm ET), air exclusively on Pop that Goes Crunch Radio.

New on Pure Pop Radio 5.2.18: Michael Carpenter Special: The Supahip’s The Two Sided Face and Carpenter, Smith and Jones’ Tom Petty Tribute

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alan headshot from schoolBy Alan Haber – Pure Pop Radio

Spins and Reviews | 5.2.18

Michael Carpenter Special:

The Supahip | The Two Sided Face (2018)
Carpenter, Smith and Jones | Petty (2018)
covercoverThe many, varied hues on the palette from which Michael Carpenter draws to paint his long line of musical masterpieces are particularly plentiful these days. Following on from a rich, vibrant collection recorded with Australian country legend Allan Caswell, and his sterling, melodic work with his band the April Family, Michael has reignited the fires that fuel the Supahip, a duo he formed with Mark Moldre, and joined with angelic voices Abby Smith and Sophie Jones to celebrate the music of the late Tom Petty. The results are magnificent across the board.

The Supahip’s Seize the World, released in 2006, mesmerized with its canny mix of genre-bending numbers and, not surprisingly, begged for a sequel. That second shot at their brass ring has been realized in the form of the duo’s smashing new long player, The Two Sided Face. Embracing rock,  pop and country, these songs emerged after days begun with a slate so clean you could eat off of it: Michael and Mark arrived at the studio each morning with nary a note written and left at the end of the day with not only a written song, but one that was also mixed.

the supahip

The Supahip: Michael Carpenter (top), Mark Moldre (bottom)

This perhaps unorthodox way of working pays huge dividends; the proof is in the grooves crafted by two friends whose shared passions are like two sides of the same coin. These passions give rich texture to songs such as the lively “With the Radio On,” a vaguely country smooth groove mixed with melodic pop convention; the slow burning  country toe-tapper “Fourarms,” about needing extra limbs to keep up with the daily traffic of life, and the four-on-the-floor Rolling Stones nod, “Motor,” an Exile on Main Street let-it-all-hang-out workout with resilient slide guitar parts and insistent drumming pushing through the armature. It’s all quite a wonderful thing.

Carpenter, Smith and Jones’ Petty, a sincere and lovely celebration of the music of one of rock’s most magnanimous songwriters and performers, now sadly departed, shares with the Supahip a deep passion for its mission but takes a softer, earthier approach on the way to its destination. Teaming up with angelic songbirds Abby Smith and Sophie Jones as Carpenter, Smith and Jones, Michael plays all of the instruments. The trio’s earthy vocal blend and the perhaps more deliberate pacing in the songs combine to amplify the emotions contained within the lyrics and musical notes for a particularly engaging listen.

smith and jones“Runnin’ Down a Dream” is recast as a slow, sometimes moody shuffle, a vocal workout bolstered by bracing electric guitars and Michael’s forceful drums. “Don’t Come Around Here No More” finds itself swimming atop a dreamy landscape played out with only nimble electric guitar backing beneath the trio’s emotional vocals (the final harmony stack is a joy to behold).

“Learning to Fly” ascends in ballad form with glorious lead and harmony vocals from Abby and Sophie and Michael’s lyrical guitar playing. The Traveling Wilburys’ “End of the Line,” which appears here as the closing song, just as it did on the first Wilburys album, takes on a singalong gospel tone; handclaps and joyous, freeing vocals abound. Your inclination will be to join in with your own vocals, but resist the temptation and enjoy the work that Carpenter, Smith and Jones have crafted. It’s quite spectacular.

Whether creating original songs or drawing different kinds of emotion from other songwriters’ material, Michael Carpenter, Mark Moldre, Abby Smith and Sophie Jones bring their best to the table. Both The Two Sided Face and Petty are proof positive that this is the case, that we are all rich beyond our wildest dreams with this music in our lives.

carpenter smith and jones new single coverblack box Where to Get It: The Supahip’s The Two Sided Face is available in digital form at the Big Radio Records Bandcamp page (the CD will be available around June 1). Purchase the digital download of Carpenter, Smith and Jones’ Petty on their Bandcamp page (the CD will also be available around June 1). Petty’s first single is “Listen to Her Heart.”

 

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Pure Pop Radio’s signature shows, Alan Haber’s Pop Tunes Deejay Show, playing the latest and greatest melodic pop songs from today and across the decades, and Pure Pop Radio: In Conversation, the premiere Internet melodic pop talk show, air weekly on Pop that Goes Crunch Radio.

pop tunes disc smallin conversation new graphic blueListen to the Pop Tunes Deejay Show on Tuesdays and Thursdays at 8 pm ET (two different shows every week); In Conversation airs every Wednesday night at 9 pm ET. Don’t miss a minute!

Tune in to Pop that Goes Crunch Radio by clicking on the following snazzy-looking button:

 

New on Pure Pop Radio 4.19.18: Gilbert O’Sullivan’s “Where Did You Go To”

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alan headshot from schoolBy Alan Haber – Pure Pop Radio

Spins and Reviews | 4.19.18

Gilbert O’Sullivan | “Where Did You Go To” | Gilbert O’Sullivan, 2018

All it takes is a song, not necessarily new but often so, to bring me back to my youth, back to my days listening to records in my bedroom, one after another after another still, closing my eyes and feeling each note and change and anticipating, because that’s what you did, the song’s fade. I swear that I could pick up the tone arm of my Symphonic all-in-one turntable without even peering ever so slightly through my closed eyelids and drop it at the beginning of a record to start the listening process all over again with hardly any effort at all and, it should be said, 100-percent accuracy.

gilbert o'sullivan 2018 albumSuch was the memory that overtook me after listening to the lovely first single from the brand-new, self-titled album from veteran singer-songwriter Gilbert O’Sullivan, releasing August 10. “Where Did You Go To” finds Gilbert in peak form, sounding all the world like he always has, singing warm melodies atop his singular piano playing and, this is the most important part: sounding like no one else in the whole wide world.

As “Where Did You Go To” was ending, and the sustained organ note at the close was coming to a full stop, I shut my eyes and remembered the feeling of listening to Gilbert’s first album, the one with “Alone Again (Naturally),” which I’d gotten from the Columbia Record Club. I became obsessed with that album, with that big hit single that graced the top spot on Billboard’s Hot 100, that was all over the radio back in the day.

But it was another song on that first album that captured my imagination even more. “Houdini Said,” a bonanza of melody and clever, stream-of-consciousness wordplay about anything and everything (and then some) seemed somehow otherworldly, yet completely relatable. I continue to play it frequently today. It is, as are so many of Gilbert’s songs, part of me.

I look forward to Gilbert O’Sullivan, to a dozen new songs that will undoubtedly capture my imagination in the same way that most all of the artist’s work has. In anticipation, I will close my eyes and sing to my inner self the opening lines of “Houdini Said”: “Doctor in love who is above/All others close to you…”

black box Where to Get It: Pre-order Gilbert O’Sullivan in various bundle configurations in Gilbert’s store. Pre-order CD, vinyl or cassette at Amazon. Pre-order the digital download and/or purchase “Where Did You Go To” immediately at Amazon.

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Pure Pop Radio’s signature shows, Alan Haber’s Pop Tunes Deejay Show, playing the latest and greatest melodic pop songs from today and across the decades, and Pure Pop Radio: In Conversation, the premiere Internet melodic pop talk show, air weekly on Pop that Goes Crunch Radio.

pop tunes disc smallin conversation new graphic blueListen to the Pop Tunes Deejay Show on Tuesdays and Thursdays at 8 pm ET (two different shows every week); In Conversation airs every Wednesday night at 9 pm ET. Don’t miss a minute!

Tune in to Pop that Goes Crunch Radio by clicking on the following snazzy-looking button:

 

New on Pure Pop Radio 4.10.18: Lannie Flowers, David Myhr, and Wilson

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By Alan Haber – Pure Pop Radio

Spins and Reviews | 4.10.18

Lannie Flowers | “Lost in a Daydream” (2018)
lannie flowers lost in a daydreamThe vibe is decidedly Beatlesque and practically overflowing with clues for you all–the Ringo Starr drum fills, loping Paul McCartney bass line and horns practically beg for a communal gathering in the Church of Fab. All this and Tears for Fears guitars and Tom Petty dust intertwine to elevate this latest in a series of monthly free songs from Lannie Flowers’ label, Spyderpop Records, to enchanting heights.

This second in Spyderpop’s free song series is made all the more special because none of these freebies will appear on Lannie’s upcoming album, Home, slated for a fall release. “Lost in a Daydream” will certainly offer up a basketful of warm and fuzzies to those for whom 1967 and 1968 are two of the most fertile years in pop music history; for everyone else, this will just be more proof, as if more were needed, that Lannie Flowers is the king of Texas pop and roll.

black box Where to Get It: Spyderpop Records (free download)

David Myhr | “The Perfect Place” | Lucky Day (2018)
david myhr lucky day coverThe fourth song, and new single, to emerge from David Myhr’s new album Lucky Day (coming May 18) is another example of the artist’s mastery of the melodic pop form. Of the four songs we’ve heard so far, this may well be my favorite. An alternately soft and insistent swirl of gorgeous melody, lovely lead and background harmony vocals and bright and shiny production technique, “The Perfect Place” is indeed perfect.

black box Where to Get It: Purchase or listen to “The Perfect Place” by clicking here. Explore the various Lucky Day bundles available here.

Wilson | “Right Here” | Single, 2018
wilson right here single coverThe quartet comprising Pink Hedgehog Records helmsman Simon Felton, Steve Wilson, Marco Rossi, and Chris Rickard delivers a cheery slice of ’60s-styled pure pop that ought to come with a repeat button sewn on its face. Just like David Myhr’s new single (see above), this song is a mix of delights that call out to melodic pop lovers and define the genre. Don’t miss it.

black box Where to Get It: Bandcamp

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Pure Pop Radio’s signature shows, Alan Haber’s Pop Tunes Deejay Show, playing the latest and greatest melodic pop songs from today and across the decades, and Pure Pop Radio: In Conversation, the premiere Internet melodic pop talk show, air weekly on Pop that Goes Crunch Radio.

pop tunes disc smallin conversation new graphic blueListen to the Pop Tunes Deejay Show on Tuesdays and Thursdays at 8 pm ET (two different shows every week); In Conversation airs every Wednesday night at 9 pm ET. Don’t miss a minute!

Tune in to Pop that Goes Crunch Radio by clicking on the following snazzy-looking button:

 

New on Pure Pop Radio 4.5.18: Farrington and The Wrecking Two

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By Alan Haber – Pure Pop Radio

Spins and Reviews | 4.5.18

Special Sunshine Pop Twofer!

Farrington | “She Only Knows” (Single, 2018)
farrington she only knows coverIt is nearly impossible to predict what Farrington’s James Patrick will come up with at any given juncture, a surety bolstered by the enigmatic artist’s latest release, a delectable sunshine pop/psych mashup with a lovely melody. A revised version (lyrics and arrangement) of a 1984 track by The Eyes of Mind, a band from the end of the Paisley Underground movement for which Patrick played guitar and sang, this is another feather in Farrington’s considerable cap and a no-brainer for your collection. (Listen to a preview on iTunes and hear the original Eyes of Mind version here.)

black box Where to Get It: iTunes

The Wrecking Two | “West Coast City” and “(The Girl’s) Unavailable”
the wrecking two coverKyler Schwartz, ’60s music fan extraordinaire, Beach Boys mega-aficionado, and compiler, sequencer and liner note scribe for the esteemed Teensville Records label, has written and recorded, with the help of Pure Pop Radio favorite Jared Lekites (The Lunar Laugh), a knockout sunshine pop single. “West Coast City” is bright, happy harmony pop of the highest order, rooted in, no surprise, Beach Boys joy (and perhaps a pinch of doo-wop spice); “(The Girl’s) Unavailable” bears the stamp of Beach Boys influence towards a jolly, infectious end. Dreamy and top-flight.

black box Where to Get It: Releases on May 4. Preorder now in progress at Amazon

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Pure Pop Radio’s signature shows, Alan Haber’s Pop Tunes Deejay Show, playing the latest and greatest melodic pop songs from today and across the decades, and Pure Pop Radio: In Conversation, the premiere Internet melodic pop talk show, air weekly on Pop that Goes Crunch Radio.

pop tunes disc smallin conversation new graphic blueListen to the Pop Tunes Deejay Show on Tuesdays and Thursdays at 8 pm ET (two different shows every week); In Conversation airs every Wednesday night at 9 pm ET. Don’t miss a minute!

Tune in to Pop that Goes Crunch Radio by clicking on the following snazzy-looking button:

 

New on Pure Pop Radio 4.3.18: Secret Friend’s The Divorce Album

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By Alan Haber – Pure Pop Radio

Spins and Reviews | 4.3.18

secret friend divorce albumSecret Friend | The Divorce Album (2018)
This third Secret Friend album, whose vibe falls somewhere between 2013’s Linus of Hollywood-produced Time Machine and 2015’s sound expansive Sleeper, could well be the ultimate breakup record, but with a pop twist. In any case, it’s terrific.

Which is to say that these songs cut right to the bone lyrically while also sounding happy and peppy and poppy. You might also say that there are two sides to Secret Friend pal Steven Fox’s new songs. Indeed, there are two sides to them–each song (there are six in all) appears as both a Fox production and as produced by another artist painting with a differently colored brush.

With the two approaches, one labeled “Mine” and the other “Yours,” you get different takes on the art of the breakup and snapshots of the forlorn from familiar pop voices who anchor Fox’s latest creations. Welcome, then, the supporting talents of Rooney’s Taylor Locke, Jellyfish’s Roger Joseph Manning, Jr., Jimm McIver, Willie Wisely, Linus (of Hollywood) Dotson, Christian Nesmith, Wyatt Funderburk, Karla Kane, and a mysterious female vocalist mysteriously known as “K.O”. Welcome, also, Rich Hinman, whose lyrical pedal steel playing elevates every song he plays on.

“Every songwriter has at least a few break-up songs tucked away,” Fox writes in the accompanying digital booklet’s introduction. Within The Divorce Album are just a few of them, including the opener, “Castaway,” a bright burst of ’80s pomp, happily sounding like a cross between early Wondermints and Haircut 100. Powered by Taylor Locke’s spirited vocals and electric guitar, and Roger Manning’s inventive keyboards, this tale of an unloved and unhappy drifter pining for companionship is the perfect opener.

The differing versions of “Difficult” perfectly illustrate The Divorce Album’s “Mine” and “Yours” concept. The “Mine” version, sung with fervor by Jimm McIver, and played by, among others, Roger Manning and Linus Dotson, barrels forward as a questioning of a partner’s attitude (“Why do you have to be so/Difficult”) and a sad assessment of faulty character: “You can be sentimental/When you’re not so judgmental/You can be fascinating/When you’re not calculating/I will be damned if I knew/What I did to deserve you.”

The “Yours” version of “Difficult” turns the tables on the song’s concept with a decidedly softer sound and a rewritten lyric espousing the female point of view. This, and there is no other way to say it, lovely version, co-written by the Corner Laughers’ Karla Kane and Steven Fox, takes a more mannered approach to sizing up the situation: “When I get your attention/You call me a drama queen/But you’re thriving on the tension/Of me wondering what you mean.”

Of course, “Castaway” and “Difficult” only scratch the surface of the power of The Divorce Album. And it should be said that not every song on this record chronicles the art of the breakup. In fact, “Undeniably Blue,” a beat-driven pop-rocker anchored by Roger Manning’s vocal and instrumental prowess, Reade Pryor’s insistent drumming, and Rich Hinman’s fluid pedal steel, offers a welcome, positive outlook–a lifeline for the sad and lonely: “Undeniably you will see/The world is quite forgiving (Yes it is!)/Even when you’re down/The sky above is undeniably blue/With a little time you’ll see/The end of undeniably blue.”

secret friend steven foxSteven Fox, who plays instruments on every one of this album’s songs, is a bit of a musical maverick, in that each of his albums exists on a different plane, even as they are connected as repositories for beautifully written, melodic songs. I always look forward to his offerings, and marvel at their ability to surprise and delight in equal measure. You, I suspect, will too.

Steven Fox guests tomorrow night at 9 pm ET on Pure Pop Radio: In Conversation. (9 pm ET on Pop that Goes Crunch Radio.)

black box Where to Get It: A wide selection of online retailers. Links to all are here on the album’s website. Dig in!

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Pure Pop Radio’s signature shows, Alan Haber’s Pop Tunes Deejay Show, playing the latest and greatest melodic pop songs from today and across the decades, and Pure Pop Radio: In Conversation, the premiere Internet melodic pop talk show, air weekly on Pop that Goes Crunch Radio.

pop tunes disc smallin conversation new graphic blueListen to the Pop Tunes Deejay Show on Tuesdays and Thursdays at 8 pm ET (two different shows every week); In Conversation airs every Wednesday night at 9 pm ET. Don’t miss a minute!

Tune in to Pop that Goes Crunch Radio by clicking on the following snazzy-looking button: