Alan Haber’s Pop Tunes Deejay Show Pops With Poptastic Sounds from Today and Yesterday!

By Alan Haber – Pure Pop Radio alan 5 small

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Exactly one month ago, our first Pop Tunes Deejay Show made its debut on Pop that Goes Crunch Radio. Our 10th show aired last night–a special mix of soft pop, bubblegum and other sweet musical treats from the 1960s and 1970s that get you singing along.

Alan Haber’s Pop Tunes Deejay Show airs twice weekly on Pop that Goes Crunch Radio–Tuesdays and Thursdays at 8 pm ET. The Tuesday show repeats Fridays at 2 pm ET; the Thursday show reprises on the following Monday at 11 am ET. Tuesday night’s show features new and recently-released tunes; Thursday night is Potpourri Night, with melodic pop classics from across the decades. You never know what you’re going to hear next!

Last night’s mix of soft pop, bubblegum and other sweet musical treats was a fun hour of catchy melodies. Check the playlist (all playlists are also posted on the Pop Tunes Deejay Show Facebook page; click here to be magically transported (and while you’re at it, please “Like” it)):

Alan Haber’s Pop Tunes Deejay Show #10 | 9-7-17

The Playlist:

1. Dana Countryman | Pop Tunes Theme

the banana spltis2. The Banana Splits | “We’re the Banana Splits” | We’re the Banana Splits, 1968

Set: Sweet ’60s Sounds

3. Gary Lewis and the Playboys | “Save Your Heart for Me” | A Session with Gary Lewis and the Playboys, 1965

4. Harpers Bizarre | “You Need a Change” | Anything Goes, 1967

5. The Ivy League | “Funny How Love Can Be” | Sounds of the Ivy League, 1967

6. The Tremeloes | “Silence is Golden” | Even the Bad Times are Good/Silence is Golden, 1967

Set: Sixties Pop Gas!

7. The Tokens | “She Lets Her Hair Down” | Both Sides Now, 1971

8. Donovan | “Wear Your Love Like Heaven” | Wear Your Love Like Heaven, 1967

the cowsills we can fly9. The Cowsills | “We Can Fly” | We Can Fly, 1968

10. Mason Williams | “Classical Gas” | The Mason Williams Phonograph Record, 1968

Set: Coconuts!

11. Hurricane Smith | “Oh Babe, What Would You Say” | Hurricane Smith, 1972

12. Cass Elliot | “It’s Getting Better” | Bubble Gum, Lemonade, and Something for Mama, 1969

13. Sailor | “Coconut” | Trouble, 1975

14. Harry Nilsson | “Coconut” | Nilsson Schmilsson, 1971

Set: Flowers on the Wall

15. The Honeycombs | “Have I the Right” | The Honeycombs, 1964

the statler bros. flowers on the wall16. The Statler Brothers | “Flowers on the Wall” | Flowers on the Wall, 1966

17. McGuinness Flint | “Malt and Barley Blues” | Malt and Barley Blues, 1971

18. The Knickerbockers | “Lies” | The Fabulous Knickerbockers – Lies, 1965

Set: Rag World

19. The Vogues | “Five O’Clock World” | The Vogues’ Greatest Hits, 1969

20. The Aranbee Pop Symphony Orchestra | “Rag Doll” | Today’s Pop Symphony, 1997

21. The Four Seasons | “Rag Doll” | Edizione D’Oro, 1997

22. Graham Gouldman | “No Milk Today” | The Graham Gouldman Thing, 1968

Set: Close

the grass roots where were you when i needed you23. The Grass Roots | “Where Were You When I Needed You” | Where Were You When I Needed You, 1966

Plus: Alan’s Snappy Deejay Patter!

See you on the radio this coming Tuesday and Thursday at 8 pm ET on Alan Haber’s Pop Tunes Deejay Show on Pop that Goes Crunch Radio!

alanhaberspurepopradiographiclarge1-wp header

Pure Pop Radio’s signature shows, Alan Haber’s Pop Tunes Deejay Show, playing the latest and greatest melodic pop songs from today and across the decades, and Pure Pop Radio: In Conversation, the premiere Internet melodic pop talk show, air weekly on Pop that Goes Crunch Radio.

pop tunes disc smallin conversation new graphic blueListen to the Pop Tunes Deejay Show on Tuesdays and Thursdays at 8 pm ET (two different shows every week); In Conversation airs every Wednesday night at 9 pm ET. Don’t miss a minute!

Tune in to Pop that Goes Crunch Radio by clicking on the following snazzy-looking button:

Pure Pop Radio: In Conversation Podcasts: Terry Draper (Airdate: August 30, 2017)

By Alan Haber – Pure Pop Radio alan 5 small

terry draper remarkable womenPure Pop Radio favorite Terry Draper returned to our virtual Pure Pop Radio: In Conversation microphones on August 30 to talk about his wonderful new album, Remarkable Women.

This time around, Terry’s song cycle revolves around a celebration of remarkable women through time, with songs about Edgar Allan Poe’s Annabel Lee, aviator Amelia Earhart, and other famous ladies. Several songs are inspired by Terry’s wife, Anna. It’s a lovely album that belongs in every pop fan’s collection.

During this lively chat, Terry talks about writing the songs for Remarkable Women and about three specific songs that were heard: “The Young Girl,” “She’s All Mine,” and “Honey B.”

pprListen to my interview with Terry Draper from August 30 by clicking the play button on the following player, or click on the Pure Pop Radio button to the left to download (then right click and choose “Save audio as” to save the file to your computer). (This interview is presented in scoped format; the songs have been removed due to copyright concerns.)

Order Terry Draper’s Remarkable Women from Terry’s online store by clicking here. Sample the songs played during this interview on iTunes by clicking here or on Amazon by clicking here:

  1. “The Young Girl” | 2. “She’s All Mine” | 3. “Honey B”

Look out for more current and archived Pure Pop Radio: In Conversation interviews.

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Pure Pop Radio’s signature shows, Alan Haber’s Pop Tunes Deejay Show, playing the latest and greatest melodic pop songs from today and across the decades, and Pure Pop Radio: In Conversation, the premiere Internet melodic pop talk show, air weekly on Pop that Goes Crunch Radio.

pop tunes disc smallin conversation new graphic blueListen to the Pop Tunes Deejay Show on Tuesdays and Thursdays at 8 pm ET (two different shows every week); In Conversation airs every Wednesday night at 9 pm ET. Don’t miss a minute!

Tune in to Pop that Goes Crunch Radio by clicking on the following snazzy-looking button:

New on Pure Pop Radio 09.05.17: The Weeklings’ Wild Take On the Beatles’ “Paperback Writer,” New Sincerity Works’ Latest, and Poppermost’s Melody Explosion

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Spins and Reviews | 09.05.17
By Alan Haber – Pure Pop Radio alan 5 small

the weeklings paperback writerThe Weeklings | “Paperback Writer” (Single, 2017)
Lefty, Zeek, Rocky and Smokestack huddle together and Weekling-ize the number one 1966 Billboard chart Beatles smash with an in-your-face-and-your-ears-too injection of contemporary immediacy, tight-knit harmonies, a surprising and smile-inducing…break, rhythmic whirligigs, Lefty’s spot-on Paul McCartney-esque bass runs, and a daring dose of Monkees derring-do for a rip-roaring, must-play-it-again-and-again two minutes and 47 seconds-long eargasm. I think that about covers it.

black box Where to Get It: Amazon, iTunes. Listen on Spotify

NSW_WONDER_LUSTNew Sincerity Works | Wonder Lust (2017)
Mike Tittel’s outfit sits on the fringe of where pop and rock meet for drinks on a Sunday afternoon, crafting inspired bellwether works fueled by a variety of influence. Alternative leanings meet pop songcraft meet a traditional rock and roll base on songs like “Find a Way Home,” an atmospheric mid-tempo ballad whose lengthy intro sets an emotional mood; “To Be Kissed Like That,” a lovely song that builds nicely and sports sensitive guitar lines; and the title number, a lively pop-rocker that sounds for all the world like U2, if Bono and company had more finite pop leanings. Tittel, aided and abetted by a more than able fellowship filled out by Roger Klug, whose singular pop-rock has been a Pure Pop Radio staple for two decades, Greg Tudor, Bob Nyswonger, Mike Landis, and Lauren Bray, has made a fine specimen, a record for dipping into for listeners inspired by the art of craft.

black box Where to Get It: The New Sincerity Works store

SongsforTheDifferent360pxPoppermost | Songs for the Different (2017)
Las Vegas popsters stake their claim for top-flight regional melodism with a generous sampling of their wares and come up with a collection that soft pop fans are sure to love. A collection of previously-released tracks and new single “Let It Shine,” a Cowsills-worthy explosion of sixties and seventies pop with lovely harmonies, Songs for the Different glows with a multitude of period smiles, from the Free Design vibe of “Tracy” to the swinging, harmony-rich clapalong reworking of the Monkees’ “Tapioca Tundra,” originally released on the Monkees’ The Birds, The Bees and the Monkees album in 1968. Alex Oliver and Roy Rendahl’s sense of the power of song steeped in strong melodies puts them at the top of the soft pop class, making this album a must-listen-to experience.

black box Where to Get It: CD Baby

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Pure Pop Radio’s signature shows, Alan Haber’s Pop Tunes Deejay Show, playing the latest and greatest melodic pop songs from today and across the decades, and Pure Pop Radio: In Conversation, the premiere Internet melodic pop talk show, air weekly on Pop that Goes Crunch Radio.

pop tunes disc smallin conversation new graphic blueListen to the Pop Tunes Deejay Show on Tuesdays and Thursdays at 8 pm ET (two different shows every week); In Conversation airs every Wednesday night at 9 pm ET. Don’t miss a minute!

Tune in to Pop that Goes Crunch Radio by clicking on the following snazzy-looking button:

Classic ’60s Pop Hit Maker Little Peggy March and Zeek Weekling Sparkle on a Pure Pop Radio: In Conversation Two-Fer; Cotton Mather, Michael Oliver, and Poppermost Lead the Charge on the Pop Tunes Deejay Show

Your host

Your host

By Alan Haber – Pure Pop Radio

A very special Pure Pop Radio: In Conversation two-fer featuring top popsters from yesterday and today, and two all-new editions of the Alan Haber’s Pop Tunes Deejay Show hit the Pop that Goes Crunch Radio airwaves this week. It is, indeed, a week to remember.

the weeklings paperback writerStar Time on Pure Pop Radio: In Conversation
On Wednesday night at 8:30 pm ET (special time), a very special Pure Pop Radio: In Conversation two-fer kicks off with the one and only Zeek Weekling behind the virtual microphone, talking about the Weeklings’ Fab new take on the Beatles’ “Paperback Writer.” Fans will not be surprised in the least that the venerable Beatles track has been Weekling-ized in the band’s usual, knowing way. Zeek also talks about the band’s upcoming releases (yes, releases); you won’t want to miss a second of this Weeklings-centric conversation.

in conversation new graphic bluelittle peggy march

 

 

 

Immediately following on Wednesday night at 9 pm ET, Peggy March, formerly known as Little Peggy March, joins me for a tour through her long running career, which began back in 1963 with her hit recording of “I Will Follow Him,” a decades-old staple of oldies radio. We’ll talk about that chestnut, and about the top-flight, recently-released compilation on Ace Records of Peggy’s recordings, If You Loved Me: RCA Recordings from Around the World 1963-1969. Did you know that Peggy recorded a very early Randy Newman song, and a cover of a Mike Love-Brian Wilson number? We’ve got all the details during this lively program, including a Beatles-related story you won’t want to miss. (Both shows repeat Saturday, starting at 2 pm ET)

pop tunes disc smallThe Pop Tunes Deejay Show is Poptastic!
The Pop Tunes Deejay Show is alive and kicking this week, with two all-new shows.

Ulf Holmberg

Ulf Holmberg

Tuesday night’s get-together at 8 pm ET features mostly new and recently-released music, including the new single from Bubble Gum Orchestra, Cotton Mather, Ray Paul, Poppermost, Stag, Anton Barbeau, and a triple-play from guitarist-extraordinaire Ulf Holmberg, late of the Longplayer Orchestra (Ulf’s new album, The Mighty Shadow, is an instrumental smorgasbord you’re going to love!). (Repeats Friday at 2 pm ET)

Pop Tunes returns on Thursday night at 8 pm ET with an as-yet-not-mixed-together-but-you-know-it’s-going-to-pop-large program featuring the greatest pop in the universe from across the decades. Details to follow. (Repeats Monday, September 11 at 11 am ET)

Mark your calendars: All-new editions of Pure Pop Radio: In Conversation with classic popster Peggy March and Zeek Weekling of the Weeklings, and two first-run episodes of Alan Haber’s Pop Tunes Deejay Show are coming this week on Pop that Goes Crunch Radio. Don’t miss a minute!

Don’t forget to check the Notes section of the Pop Tunes Deejay Show page on Facebook for the latest show playlists. Click here to be magically transported.

alanhaberspurepopradiographiclarge1-wp header

Pure Pop Radio’s signature shows, Alan Haber’s Pop Tunes Deejay Show, playing the latest and greatest melodic pop songs from today and across the decades, and Pure Pop Radio: In Conversation, the premiere Internet melodic pop talk show, air weekly on Pop that Goes Crunch Radio.

pop tunes disc smallin conversation new graphic blueListen to the Pop Tunes Deejay Show on Tuesdays and Thursdays at 8 pm ET (two different shows every week); In Conversation airs every Wednesday night at 9 pm ET. Don’t miss a minute!

Tune in to Pop that Goes Crunch Radio by clicking on the following snazzy-looking button:

Pure Pop Radio: In Conversation Podcasts: Coke Belda (Airdate: August 23, 2017)

in conversation new graphic blue

By Alan Haber – Pure Pop Radio alan 5 small

Singer-songwriter and world traveler Coke Belda returned to Pure Pop Radio: In Conversation on August 23 in a different role–that of classic melodic pop interpreter, helping to spin and talk about songs from his majestic new album, Coke Belda 3 (Gs): A Tribute to the Bee Gees, now available on CD from Kool Kat Musik and as a download from Futureman Records.

I love what Coke has done, pouring his heart out with his peerless covers of some of the greatest melodic pop songs ever recorded; check out my review of Coke’s album here and watch how fast you click on one of the above links.

During this program, Coke talks about his commitment to his Bee Gees project, and why he chose the songs he eventually covered. It’s another in-depth back-and-forth with one of our most creative musicians that you can only hear on In Conversation, the premiere Internet melodic pop music talk show.

pprListen to my interview with Coke Belda from August 23 by clicking the play button on the following player, or click on the Pure Pop Radio button to the left to download (then right click and choose “Save audio as” to save the file to your computer). (This interview is presented in scoped format; the songs have been removed due to copyright concerns.)

Test drive the songs played during this interview by clicking on the following links residing on the Futureman Records Bandcamp page:

“Claustrophobia” | https://futuremanrecords.bandcamp.com/track/claustrophobia

“Sir Geoffrey Saved the World” | https://futuremanrecords.bandcamp.com/track/sir-geoffery-saved-the-world

“You Win Again” | https://futuremanrecords.bandcamp.com/track/you-win-again

Listen to the entire album by clicking here, and don’t forget to purchase either the CD or a digital download.

Look out for more current and archived Pure Pop Radio: In Conversation interviews.

alanhaberspurepopradiographiclarge1-wp header

Pure Pop Radio’s signature shows, Alan Haber’s Pop Tunes Deejay Show, playing the latest and greatest melodic pop songs from today and across the decades, and Pure Pop Radio: In Conversation, the premiere Internet melodic pop talk show, air weekly on Pop that Goes Crunch Radio.

pop tunes disc smallin conversation new graphic blueListen to the Pop Tunes Deejay Show on Tuesdays and Thursdays at 8 pm ET (two different shows every week); In Conversation airs every Wednesday night at 9 pm ET. Don’t miss a minute!

Tune in to Pop that Goes Crunch Radio by clicking on the following snazzy-looking button:

New on Pure Pop Radio 08.31.17: Jerry Yester’s Vital Pass Your Light Around and Phil Angotti’s Majestic Such Stories

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Spins and Reviews | 08.31.17
By Alan Haber – Pure Pop Radio alan 5 small

Yester - Pass Your Light Around OV-246Jerry Yester | Pass Your Light Around (Omnivore, 2017)
The list of artists Jerry Yester was associated with back in the 1960s and 1970s suggests his path in the music was lit by angels; he played in bands as diverse as the Lovin’ Spoonful, the Modern Folk Quartet, and Rosebud, and sat in the producer’s chair for albums by artists such as the Association, Tim Buckley, and the Turtles.

Yester, who started out playing in a duo dubbed the Yester Brothers with his equally talented brother Jim (who was a member of the Association and, in fact, still is), recorded various tracks through the 1970s yet never released a solo album. Enter Omnivore Records, which came to the rescue and righted a decades-old wrong with this glorious collection of 15 songs that act collectively as a master class in pop singing and songwriting.

These wonderful songs, written with Larry Beckett, who worked with Tim Buckley, run the gamut from the country-tinged celebratory pop of the joyous “My Dusty Darling” to the pretty, almost hymnlike “Brooklyn Girl,” which features some of the most intricate, close and affecting harmonies you could imagine hearing; and the amazing “All I Can Do is Dance,” a very Association-like performance that also puts the emphasis on singing that will do nothing less than send shivers up your spine.

Omnivore has been at the forefront of the much-appreciated and important movement to rescue and bring to light important catalog and previously-unheard recordings.  Being able to appreciate music from years past allows listeners to better understand and put into context the breadth of an artist’s career. With Pass Your Light Around, the company has released what can only be viewed as one of the most vital releases of 2017.

black box Where to Get It: The Omnivore Shop (Pre-order) (releases October 6)

phil angotti such storiesPhil Angotti | Such Stories (2017)
A staple of Pure Pop Radio playlists since the early 2000s, Chicago musician Phil Angotti’s music, whether performed solo or with his group the Idea, is always an engaging listen. This new album, a stripped-down collection of personal, acoustic songs with just guitars, accordion and dulcimer in the mix, offers a chance to hear Phil’s songs in an intimate setting.

These heartfelt songs resonate deeply with meaning and emotion. “Brown Eyes Never Lie,” against a vaguely old English folk backdrop, peers into a soul that’s lost its way, and offers a way back: “You can always get it back/So smile a little smile/Sad eyes don’t look good on you/And sorrow’s not your style.” The narrator of “Sunny Day on the East Side” is out for a stroll amidst random observations, when the sun goes down and it’s time to take stock: “And now it’s late and the sun is gone/We’re walking home/Sing a Beatles song/We laugh as if there is nothing wrong/It was a sunny day on the east side.” Is he hiding some regret?

Perhaps the centerpiece of this album is the joyous “Singing in the Yard,” in which a young boy auditions for a life in song (“In a small backyard he waits and stands alone/A broomstick and a ball for a microphone/You can hear his voice from across the fence/Patiently waiting for his audience”). By the end of the song, he finds himself assessing his position, a commitment to his burgeoning art: “It’s time to go, his friends are off to play/Though he wants to be one of them, he’s miles away/Though he wants to go along/He’s worlds away.”

An insightful collection of songs, beautifully sung and played, Such Stories is such a draw of honest emotion set to lovely melodies that I can’t help but recommend it wholeheartedly to one and all.

black box Where to Get It: CD Baby, iTunes. Listen on Spotify

alanhaberspurepopradiographiclarge1-wp header

Pure Pop Radio’s signature shows, Alan Haber’s Pop Tunes Deejay Show, playing the latest and greatest melodic pop songs from today and across the decades, and Pure Pop Radio: In Conversation, the premiere Internet melodic pop talk show, air weekly on Pop that Goes Crunch Radio.

pop tunes disc smallin conversation new graphic blueListen to the Pop Tunes Deejay Show on Tuesdays and Thursdays at 8 pm ET (two different shows every week); In Conversation airs every Wednesday night at 9 pm ET. Don’t miss a minute!

Tune in to Pop that Goes Crunch Radio by clicking on the following snazzy-looking button:

Pure Pop Radio’s Hall of Fame Inducts Fountains of Wayne’s Utopia Parkway (Atlantic, 1999)

hall of fame
By Alan Haber – Pure Pop Radio
alan 5 small

fountains of wayne utopia parkwayWhat Is It?
Pure Pop Radio’s Hall of Fame celebrates unparalleled work in the field of melodic pop music. All kinds of melodic pop are eligible for induction, from soft-pop to power-pop and all points in-between. Country-pop, bubblegum, art-pop and the like are welcome. Singles, EPs, and albums are eligible from the 1960s to today. The only caveat is an inductee must emphasize melody above all else.

Our First Inductee:
Fountains of Wayne’s Utopia Parkway (Atlantic, 1999)

Our first inductee is an album that basically drew the blueprint for all melodic pop albums that followed it. Fountains of Wayne’s Utopia Parkway’s 14 songs, chiming with lovely, catchy melodies, lots of guitars, sumptuous singing, et al., are populated by all sorts of eclectic characters, whose captivating stories are told in the catchiest of musical terms. The bar is set high; each of these songs aims for lyrical and melodic excellence and hits the bullseye every time.

A concept album of sorts, Utopia Parkway can be seen as a snapshot of life in the five boroughs of New York, or in the areas surrounding your town if you prefer, because, really, the themes pursued within this album are fairly universal, even as some of the songs refer to actual living, breathing landmarks and concern people types whom you and I might well know.

Liberty Travel; Coney Island; the Hayden Planetarium; the Long Island Expressway, or as it’s better known, the L.I.E., or as it’s even better known, The World’s Largest Parking Lot; the Jersey Shore; and Long Island Sound get name-checked along the musical journey down and around Utopia Parkway. And then there are the people that populate the area.

Back cover of Utopia Parkway booklet

Back cover of Utopia Parkway booklet

Under the Hood
Take the title song, which takes place on Utopia Parkway, a big area in Queens, New York. The song tells the story of an underachiever who’s “…never turned from boy to man.” The narrator is a budding music star who pledges to staple fliers everywhere to get his “name in front of everyone.” In the end, though, he admits that “they’ll never know what hit them when” he’s “gone.”

The similarly underachieving, clueless-in-love sap of the classic “Red Dragon Tattoo” takes listeners on a virtual tour of his stated objective: to get the girl. He boasts about getting “engraved,” but only after getting drunk. He pines to get a Red Dragon Tattoo slapped on his person, which he believes ought to do the trick. In fact, he seems convinced of it, kinda-sorta, although he does question his viability: “I’m fit to be dyed/Am I fit to have you.”

The Red Dragon Tattoo is going to transform this guy into an alluring figure. “Will you stop pretending I’ve never been born/Now I look a little more like that guy from KorN,” he sings to his intended. “If you came a little bit closer/You’d see it isn’t painted on.” And, by gum, it’s real!

Also real are the emotions felt and communicated by songwriters Chris Collingwood and Adam Schlesinger. The subject of the heartfelt yet sad “Hat and Feet,” a Warner Bros. cartoon come to life, is reduced to being “a spot on the sidewalk/A mark on the street.” And he couldn’t bear to confront the issues at hand: “I started running when I saw it coming/It got faster and louder til I took a powder.”

The unflinchingly sad “Troubled Times” chronicles a relationship whose clock has run out, the end of which is at least guardedly copacetic (“Maybe one day soon it’ll all come out/How you dream about each other sometimes/With a memory of how you once gave up/But you made it through the troubled times.” I cry while listening to this one all the time.

James and Jason, Kirk and Lars, in no particular order

James and Jason, Kirk and Lars, in no particular order

Hold the Gloom
All is not gloomy along Utopia Parkway, however. The kids barrelled into their parents’ car in the goofy “Laser Show” “come from Bridgeport, Westport, Darien/Down to the Hayden Planetarium,” where Pink Floyd’s Dark Side of the Moon would play as images were thrust upon the walls surrounding them. But these kids might be after bigger prey: “We’re gonna sit back, relax, watch the stars/James and Jason, Kirk and Lars,” they proclaim. And then it’s time to go home: “We’re gonna make our way cross the galaxy/And then we’ll head back home on the L.I.E.” If they can get out of the “parking lot,” that is.

I always thought the girl in the peppy “Lost in Space” was just a well-meaning hippie chick–a little off-center, perhaps. And that’s the way the lyrics portray her, but I always held a bit of caution, thinking that there might be more to her aloofness. A serious undercurrent to an otherwise playful song? Or could she possibly be a lovable pterodactyl or an alien from Mars? After all, according to the song, “…she walks the earth/But she’s not from the human race/She’s a pretty little thing but she’s lost/Yeah she’s lost in space…”

The happy, guitar-centric power pop number “It Must Be Summer” sounds like it’s a celebration of sun, surf and sand, but it’s really a jaunty lament of the girl that got–no, went–away. “…it must be summer/Cause I’m falling apart.”

The album closer, a somber number called “The Senator’s Daughter,” is all about the noise that permeates our conversations. All sorts of people go about their business, from teenage girls to soccer moms, and talk, talk, talk, without the messages getting through: “He say/Sha la la la la la/He say/Sha la la la la la.”

brilliant_mind_cs2A New Look
This isn’t the first time I’ve thought and written about Fountains of Wayne’s Utopia Parkway; it was the subject, on January 19, 2016, of the first entry in my I Love that Album! series (read it here to possibly get some more insight). Obviously, that wasn’t the end of my fascination with this incredible, topically dense album.

Albums such as Utopia Parkway demand your attention and pay off dividends. Through its songs, you learn a little bit more about life in general and, perhaps–just perhaps–a little bit more about your life. Of course, you could just tap your feet and play air guitar as the songs roll, but that would be shortchanging this album’s copious rewards.

Which is why this album–Fountains of Wayne’s Utopia Parkway–is the first melodic pop work to be inducted into Pure Pop Radio’s Hall of Fame.

The Deets

Fountains of Wayne/Utopia Parkway (Atlantic, 1999)

Personnel: Chris Collingwood, lead vocals, guitar, keyboards; Adam Schlesinger, vocals, bass, guitar, keyboards; Jody Porter, guitar, vocals; Brian Young, drums, percussion

The Songs:
1. Utopia Parkway
2. Red Dragon Tattoo
3. Denise
4. Hat and Feet
5. The Valley of Malls
6. Troubled Times
7. Go, Hippie
8. A Fine Day for a Parade
9. Amity Gardens
10. Laser Show
11. Lost in Space
12. Prom Theme
13. It Must Be Summer
14. The Senator’s Daughter

Producers: Chris Collingwood and Adam Schlesinger

black box Where to Get It: Amazon, iTunes

alanhaberspurepopradiographiclarge1-wp header

Pure Pop Radio’s signature shows, Alan Haber’s Pop Tunes Deejay Show, playing the latest and greatest melodic pop songs from today and across the decades, and Pure Pop Radio: In Conversation, the premiere Internet melodic pop talk show, air weekly on Pop that Goes Crunch Radio.

pop tunes disc smallin conversation new graphic blueListen to the Pop Tunes Deejay Show on Tuesdays and Thursdays at 8 pm ET (two different shows every week); In Conversation airs every Wednesday night at 9 pm ET. Don’t miss a minute!

Tune in to Pop that Goes Crunch Radio by clicking on the following snazzy-looking button: